Jimi Hendrix Encyclopedia | The Official Jimi Hendrix Site

Jimi Hendrix Encyclopedia

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Recording

August 07th, 1968

A mid-day session at the Record Plant yields some additional mixes of “Long Hot Summer Night,” none of which are tagged as a final version.
Linda McCartney photographs the Experience in New York’s Central Park. Several small children are gathered and hang-out with Jimi, Mitch, and Noel on the Alice In Wonderland statue in the heart of Park. Hendrix later chooses these photographs for the cover of the forthcoming Electric Ladyland double-LP.

Releases

August 19th, 1968

The new Jimi Hendrix film, “Experience” (aka “See My Music Talking”) by Peter Neal is shown at London’s National Film Theatre as part of a British festival of short films. The film includes a 12-string guitar solo of Hendrix performing “Hear My Train A Comin’.”

Releases

August 20th, 1968

A second showing of “Experience” is made at 6:15 p.m. at London’s National Film Theatre.
Supported by Soft Machine and Eire Apparent, the Experience perform two shows at the Mosque in Richmond, Virginia. Among the song performed were “I Don’t Live Today” and “Red House.”
Jan Bridge interviews Jimi Hendrix for the Richmond Times-Dispatch.

Recording

August 27th, 1968

The Experience return to the Record Plant to put the finishing touches on their forthcoming release, Electric Ladyland. Work on “Gypsy Eyes” on this night focused on the flanging effects, which had studio engineers Eddie Kramer and Gary Kellgren physically putting pressure on the flange reel of the tape deck during recording.
While Hendrix and Kramer labored over the master tape for Electric Ladyland, Kallgren, Mitchell and Redding recorded twelve-takes of Redding’s own composition, “How Can I Live,” which later appeared on the debut release for Redding’s new band, Fat Mattress.
With only one more track required to complete the album, the group turned to Earl King’s “Come On (Part One)” to fill the final track. After fourteen takes, the final take was selected as the basic track for the album. Electric Ladyland was now complete.