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Jimi Hendrix Encyclopedia

Did you see Jimi Hendrix in concert? Did you meet Jimi Hendrix or have the opportunity to interview him or have some other unique, first-person encounter with Jimi Hendrix? If so, Experience Hendrix wants to hear from you.

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Interviews

Febrero 04th, 1970

Under the watchful eye of manager, Michael Jeffery Rolling Stone’s John Burks was invited to Jeffery’s office on West 37th Street in New York to interview Hendrix, Mitch Mitchell and Noel Redding (who was recently brought in from England). Jeffery clearly wanted to present the original Jimi Hendrix Experience as a united group and that the disastrous Madison Square Garden performance by Hendrix with the Band Of Gypsys was a single, isolated episode. Rolling Stone was at the forefront of the counter cultural press and Jeffrey desperately wanted to the benefit of positive coverage for his artist.

In his interview, Burks made several attempts to pin Hendrix down on his present musical course, but Hendrix offered no definitive explanation or plan. Rather than lay out a comprehensive plan for the Experience, Hendrix alluded to possible future jamming and recording with Cox and Miles. The guitarist also described the recent Madison Square Garden performance as ‘the end of a big fairy tale’.

Interviews

Febrero 04th, 1970

Under the watchful eye of manager, Michael Jeffery Rolling Stone's John Burks was invited to Jeffery's office on West 37th Street in New York to interview Hendrix, Mitchell and Redding (whom was recently brought in from England), in a carefully controlled environment. Wanting the trio to appear as a united force that was to again be known as The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Jeffrey pressed to get positive press coverage in the pages of Rolling Stone.

During the interview Hendrix is asked several questions about his evolving music direction where he eludes to expanded musical offerings. Have you given any thought to touring with the Experience as the basic unit, but bringing along other people? Or would that be too confusing?

No, it shouldn't be. Maybe I'm the evil one, right [laughs]. But there isn't any reason for it to be like that. I even want the name to be Experience anyway, and still be this mish-mash moosh-mash between Madame Flipflop And Her Harmonite Social Workers.

It's a nice name.

It's a nice game. No, like about putting other groups on the tour, like our friends - I don't know about that right now; not at a stage like this, because we're in the process of getting our own thing together as far as a three piece group. But eventually, we have time on the side to play with friends. That's why I'll probably be jamming with Buddy [Miles] and Billy [Cox]; probably be recording, too, on the side, and they'll be doing the same.

Do you every think in terms of going out with a dozen people?

I like Stevie Winwood; he's one of those dozen people. But things don't have to be official all the time. Things don't have to be formal for jams and stuff. But I haven't had a chance to get in contact with him."

With Hendrix's growing interest in Steve Winwood and a growing relationship with Billy Cox, it was clear in Hendrix's mind that the original Experience group would never reform - he was right.