Jimi Hendrix Encyclopedia

Did you see Jimi Hendrix in concert? Did you meet Jimi Hendrix or have the opportunity to interview him or have some other unique, first-person encounter with Jimi Hendrix? If so, Experience Hendrix wants to hear from you.

Submit Your Story

1966 1967 1968 1969 1970
Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep
                                                   
                                                 
                                                                                   
                                               
                                                                   
                                                         
                                   
                                       
                                                                   

Search Results

May 02, 1968

Recording for “Three Little Bears” would take place at the Record Plant, where Steve Winwood, Jack Casady and a host of others visited the group. Although Hendrix originally coined the title, “Cherokee Mist” for the session, he later settled on “Three Little Bears” as its final working title. Throughout the session, Jimi developed a jazzy rhythm pattern that would eventually become “South Saturn Delta.” As the session progressed, Hendrix and bassist, Noel Redding get into a heated argument about the number of people in the studio. In his autobiography, Are You Experienced? Redding says, “There were tons of people in the studio – you couldn’t even move. It was a party not a session. He just said, ‘Relax man…’ I’d been relaxing for months, so I relaxed my way right out the place, not caring if I ever saw him again.” Taking a break from the session Hendrix leads an entourage to their local hangout at the Scene Club for some fun. Afterwards, Hendrix, Mitch Mitchell, Eddie Kramer, Winwood, Casady, Larry Coryell and others, return to the Record Plant to jam. These jams would become the foundation of “Voodoo Chile.” A number of recordings with Winwood and Casady participating were laid to tape on this night, with 3 of the takes being fused together as “Voodoo Chile Blues,” which was released on MCA’s 1994 release – :Blues.

Casady eddie kramer Hendrix Jack Casady Larry Coryell Mitch Mitchell Noel Redding Record Plant Recording Steve Winwood Three Little Bears Winwood

May 31, 1968

Hendrix jams with members of Traffic, including Dave Mason, Chris Wood, Steve Winwood, Trevor Burton, Carl Wayne and Vic Briggs at Hallenstadion. Chris Wood records the jam on his portable tape recorder. The second night of performances for the Pop-Montserkonzert take place at Hallenstadion. Afterwards, Keith Altham interviews Hendrix for the June 8 edition of New Musical Express.

ave Mason Carl Wayne Chris Wood Recording Steve Winwood Trevor Burton Vic Briggs

June 15, 1970

Jimi holds his first recording session in the new Electric Lady Studios at 52 West 8th Street in the heart of Greenwich Village. Hendrix invites his friends Steve Winwood and Chris Wood from Traffic into the studio where they quickly break into an impromptu jam session. With Mitch Mitchell unavailable Eddie Kramer volunteered Dave Palmer to sit in behind the drums for the session. As the night progressed, Jimi was able to coax Wood and Winwood into providing some backing vocals on ”Ezy Rider” which Jimi was carrying over from his stints at the Record Plant. Also put to tape on this night were renditions of Traffic’s own “Pearl Queen” and Winwood’s own “Rhythm Ace.” Work soon progressed to Jimi’s composition, “Valleys Of Neptune” before segueing into a loose untitled jazz-focused jam and later a track titled “Slow Blues.” Jenny Dean, a mutual friend of Jimi and Winwood, offered backing vocals on the later recording.

Chris Wood Electric Lady Studios first recording session Greenwich Village Recording Steve Winwood