Jimi Hendrix Encyclopedia

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April 07, 1967

In the afternoon, Jimi Hendrix and Mitch Mitchell are photographed by Mike Huggon at the Fringe Boutique in Carlisle.

1967 April April 7 Band Carlisle Cumberland Fringe Boutique Mike Huggon Mitch Mitchell Photo Session United Kingdom

March 04, 1968

Redding and Mitch Mitchell fly to Nassau (The Bahamas), while Hendrix returns to New York. In the evening, he jams with Eric Clapton at The Scene Club.

Band Eric Clapton Mitch Mitchell Redding the scene club

April 11, 1968

Chris Welch interviews Mitch Mitchell for Melody Maker. The piece is published on April 20.

Chris Welch Interviews Melody Maker Mitch Mitchell

May 02, 1968

Recording for “Three Little Bears” would take place at the Record Plant, where Steve Winwood, Jack Casady and a host of others visited the group. Although Hendrix originally coined the title, “Cherokee Mist” for the session, he later settled on “Three Little Bears” as its final working title. Throughout the session, Jimi developed a jazzy rhythm pattern that would eventually become “South Saturn Delta.” As the session progressed, Hendrix and bassist, Noel Redding get into a heated argument about the number of people in the studio. In his autobiography, Are You Experienced? Redding says, “There were tons of people in the studio – you couldn’t even move. It was a party not a session. He just said, ‘Relax man…’ I’d been relaxing for months, so I relaxed my way right out the place, not caring if I ever saw him again.” Taking a break from the session Hendrix leads an entourage to their local hangout at the Scene Club for some fun. Afterwards, Hendrix, Mitch Mitchell, Eddie Kramer, Winwood, Casady, Larry Coryell and others, return to the Record Plant to jam. These jams would become the foundation of “Voodoo Chile.” A number of recordings with Winwood and Casady participating were laid to tape on this night, with 3 of the takes being fused together as “Voodoo Chile Blues,” which was released on MCA’s 1994 release – :Blues.

Casady eddie kramer Hendrix Jack Casady Larry Coryell Mitch Mitchell Noel Redding Record Plant Recording Steve Winwood Three Little Bears Winwood

May 22, 1968

Mitch Mitchell, Noel Redding and his sister Vicki, and Eric Barrett arrive in Italy after flying from London’s Heathrow International Airport.

Heathrow International Airport Italy Mitch Mitchell Noel Redding Personal

September 09, 1968

Hendrix, Mitch Mitchell and Noel Redding travel to Portland, Oregon for an evening performance at Memorial Coliseum with support from Vanilla Fudge, Eire Apparent, and Soft Machine. The Experience’s set includes “Are You Experienced?” “Fire,” “Hey Joe,” “Foxey Lady,” “Voodoo Child (Slight Return),” “Little Wing,” “Spanish Castle Magic,” “Red House,” and “Purple Haze.” Jimi Hendrix is photographed in concert at the Memorial Coliseum in Portland, Oregon on September 9, 1968. Photo: Alan Hicks / © Authentic Hendrix, LLC

Eire Apparent Hendrix Live Memorial Coliseum Mitch Mitchell Noel Redding Oregon Portland Soft Machine Vanilla Fudge

September 18, 1968

Jimi Hendrix, Noel Redding, Mitch Mitchell, Buddy Miles, Graham Bond and Eric Burdon jam at the Whiskey A Go Go in Hollywood, California.

Buddy Miles California Eric Burdon Graham Bond Hollywood Jimi Hendrix Live Mitch Mitchell Noel Redding Whiskey A Go Go

September 19, 1968

Noel Redding and Mitch Mitchell return to London, England.

England London Mitch Mitchell Noel Redding Personal

October 01, 1968

Mitch Mitchell and Noel Redding return to Los Angeles. Hendrix travels from Los Angeles International Airport to Honolulu, Hawaii where he is promptly interviewed by Wayne Harada for the October 3 issue of The Honolulu Advertiser.

Hawaii Honolulu Los Angeles Los Angeles International Airport Mitch Mitchell Noel Redding Personal

December 03, 1968

Mitch Mitchell and Noel Redding return to London for the Christmas Holidays. During this time, Redding teamed up with Jim Leverton and Eric Dillon to record 12 tracks for the upcoming Fat Mattress album.

Eric Dillon Fat Mattress album Jim Leverton Mitch Mitchell Noel Redding Recording

December 10, 1968

Mitch Mitchell joins John Lennon, Yoko Ono, Eric Clapton, The Who, Jethro Tull, Taj Mahall, Marianne Faithfull and several others for the Rolling Stones’ “Rock & Roll Circus” at the BBC’s Wembley Studios in London. Mitchell joins The Dirty Mac on their performance of “Yer Blues.”

Eric Clapton Events Jethro Tull John Lennon Marianne Faithfull Mitch Mitchell Taj Mahall The Who Yoko Ono

December 12, 1968

Wembley Studios London, England Yer Blues Mitch Mitchell joined John Lennon, Keith Richards, and Eric Clapton to take part in the Rolling Stones Great Rock & Roll Circus television special. The group, which Lennon dubbed the Dirty Mac, performed a version of “Yer Blues”. This legendary recording remained unreleased for more than two decades before ABKCO Records released the program on CD and home video.

1968 ABKCO Records December 12 Dirty Mac England Eric Clapton John Lennon Keith Richards London Mitch Mitchell Recording Rolling Stones Great Rock & Roll Circus television special unreleased Wembley Studios Yer Blues

May 14, 1969

Record Plant, New York Studio Recording 1) Freedom 2) Jam 292 3) Untitled Jam 4) Horn & Piano Jam Backed by Mitch Mitchell, bassist Billy Cox, and organist Sharon Layne, Jimi recorded “Jam 292”, which was later posthumously issued as part of Jimi Hendrix :Blues. Later that evening, the group was joined by an unnamed trumpet player who contributed to series of untitled instrumental jams before the session concluded.

billy cox Freedom Horn & Piano Jam Jam 292 Jimi Mitch Mitchell Recording Sharon Layne Untitled Jam

November 06, 1969

Mitch Mitchell attends the wedding ceremony of ex-Experience bassist, Noel Redding and Susan Fowsby in Kent, England while Hendrix remains present in New York City.

Mitch Mitchell Noel Redding Personal Susan Fowsby

February 01, 1970

Throughout this month, both Mitch Mitchell and Billy Cox joined Hendrix at his 59 West 12th Street apartment in Greenwich Village for exploratory jam sessions. Hendrix made a number of home recordings during this period. Hendrix alternated between acoustic and electric guitar as he routined such fare as “Stepping Stone,” “Send My Love To Linda”, “Last Thursday Morning,” “Freedom,” “Bolero”, and the fleeting, twelve-string “Acoustic Demo” featured as part of the Dagger Records release Morning Symphony Ideas.

Acoustic Demo Billy Cox. jam sessions Bolero Dagger Records Freedom Last Thursday Morning Mitch Mitchell Send My Love To Linda Stepping Stone Stories

February 04, 1970

Under the watchful eye of manager, Michael Jeffery Rolling Stone’s John Burks was invited to Jeffery’s office on West 37th Street in New York to interview Hendrix, Mitch Mitchell and Noel Redding (who was recently brought in from England). Jeffery clearly wanted to present the original Jimi Hendrix Experience as a united group and that the disastrous Madison Square Garden performance by Hendrix with the Band Of Gypsys was a single, isolated episode. Rolling Stone was at the forefront of the counter cultural press and Jeffrey desperately wanted to the benefit of positive coverage for his artist. In his interview, Burks made several attempts to pin Hendrix down on his present musical course, but Hendrix offered no definitive explanation or plan. Rather than lay out a comprehensive plan for the Experience, Hendrix alluded to possible future jamming and recording with Cox and Miles. The guitarist also described the recent Madison Square Garden performance as ‘the end of a big fairy tale’.

Interviews Jimi Hendrix John Burks Michael Jeffery Rolling Stone Mitch Mitchell Noel Redding Rolling Stone

February 16, 1970

Juggy Sound, New York Studio Recording Record Plant, New York Studio Recording On this evening, Hendrix traveled to the Record Plant after mixing sessions at Juggy Sound had concluded. Upon his arrival, an informal jam session with Buddy Miles ensued. Two instrumental attempts at “Blue Suede Shoes” were put to tape. Later, Hendrix put forward an early version of what would become to “Hey Baby (New Rising Sun).” Singing live and supported only by drums and percussion, Hendrix wove gorgeous touches of Spanish flamenco styling within the arrangement. An impish stab at Eddie Cochran’s “Summertime Blues”—a favorite of the guitarist’s when he was a teenager in Seattle—was followed by a funky original work reminiscent of “Day Tripper.” Soon thereafter Billy Cox and Mitch Mitchell arrived. Buddy Miles departed and work began on “Freedom”. This recording, issued on The Jimi Hendrix Experience box set, is dramatically different than the version now included as part of First Rays Of The New Rising Sun. Most notably, Jimi devised an inventive, extended introduction and, in contrast to his efforts the previous summer with Gypsys Sun & Rainbows, skillfully integrated the percussion effort of Juma Sultan.

billy cox Blue Suede Shoes Buddy Miles Eddie Cochran Hey Baby Juggy Sound Mitch Mitchell Record Plant Recording

April 25, 1970

A new Jimi Hendrix Experience, featuring Hendrix (guitar), Mitch Mitchell (drums), and Billy Cox (bass) makes its debut at the Los Angeles Forum. The performance also marks the start of what would become that last US Tour by Jimi Hendrix. Supported by The Buddy Miles Express and Ballin’ Jack the sold out-performance (20,000) The Experience’s 85-minute set featured “Spanish Castle Magic,” “Foxey Lady,” “Lover Man,” “Hear My Train A Comin’,” “Message To Love,” “Ezy Ryder,” “Machine Gun,” “Room Full Of Mirrors,” “Hey Baby (New Rising Sun),” “Villanova Junction,” “Freedom,” “Star Spangled Banner,” “Purple Haze,” and “Voodoo Child (Slight Return).” Jimi Hendrix performs on stage during The Experience’s first show of their final US Tour, April 25, 1970 at the Los Angeles Forum in Inglewood, California. Photo: Chuck Boyd / © Authentic Hendrix, LLC

billy cox Events Jimi Hendrix Experience Los Angeles Forum Mitch Mitchell The Buddy Miles Express

June 05, 1970

Continuing on their North American tour, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, featuring Mitch Mitchell (drums), Billy Cox (bass), and Jimi Hendrix (guitar) perform at the Memorial Auditorium in Dallas, TX.

billy cox Jimi Hendrix Live Mitch Mitchell The Jimi Hendrix Experience

June 17, 1970

Returning once again to Electric Lady, Hendrix enthusiastically kicked off the session right where the prior night’s left off. In visiting “Straight Ahead” Hendrix, Billy Cox, and Mitch Mitchell concentrated on forming a new master take of the song. The trio then moves to recordings for “Astro Man.” Feeling playful, Jimi brings the session to a quick halt before yelling for tape machine to start recording. Assured that the tapes are rolling Jimi breaks into a high octave vocal take of “Drifter’s Escape.”

billy cox Electric Lady Hendrix Mitch Mitchell Recording Straight Ahead

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