Jimi Hendrix Encyclopedia

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May 14, 1969

Record Plant, New York Studio Recording 1) Freedom 2) Jam 292 3) Untitled Jam 4) Horn & Piano Jam Backed by Mitch Mitchell, bassist Billy Cox, and organist Sharon Layne, Jimi recorded “Jam 292”, which was later posthumously issued as part of Jimi Hendrix :Blues. Later that evening, the group was joined by an unnamed trumpet player who contributed to series of untitled instrumental jams before the session concluded.

billy cox Freedom Horn & Piano Jam Jam 292 Jimi Mitch Mitchell Recording Sharon Layne Untitled Jam

January 23, 1970

With Bob Hughes and Dave Ragno monitoring the control desk, Hendrix guided the band through lively renditions of “Villanova Junction Blues” including one take lasting in excess of fifteen minutes. Several extended jams were recorded on this evening including “MLK,” “Slow Time Blues,” and “Burning Desire.”

Later joined by an unidentified harp player, Hendrix leads the session through another extended track, this time Carl Perkins’ “Blue Suede Shoes.” Joined by Billy Cox, Hendrix also dabbled around “Freedom” and “Highways Of Desire” the later which gradually segued into “Seven Dollars In My Pocket.”

Following the blues groove already set in place, Hendrix then began to tackle “Midnight Lightning,” “Freedom,” “Country Blues,” and “Once I Had A Woman.” In 1974, an edited take of “Once I Had A Woman” featuring overdubbed harmonica parts by Buddy Lucas was prepped for 1975’s compilation Midnight Lightning (Reprise Records, MS 2229). An extended rendition was also later included on 1994’s Jimi Hendrix :Blues (Experience Hendrix/MCA, MCAD-11060).

1970 billy cox Blue Suede Shoes Bob Hughes Burning Desire Carl Perkins Country Blues Dave Ragno Freedom Highways Of Desire January 23 MLK Once I Had A Woman Recording Slow Time Blues Villanova Junction Blues

February 01, 1970

Throughout this month, both Mitch Mitchell and Billy Cox joined Hendrix at his 59 West 12th Street apartment in Greenwich Village for exploratory jam sessions. Hendrix made a number of home recordings during this period. Hendrix alternated between acoustic and electric guitar as he routined such fare as “Stepping Stone,” “Send My Love To Linda”, “Last Thursday Morning,” “Freedom,” “Bolero”, and the fleeting, twelve-string “Acoustic Demo” featured as part of the Dagger Records release Morning Symphony Ideas.

Acoustic Demo Billy Cox. jam sessions Bolero Dagger Records Freedom Last Thursday Morning Mitch Mitchell Send My Love To Linda Stepping Stone Stories

May 15, 1970

Returning to the “Studio C” at the Record Plant, continued work on “Freedom” was the focus of the group’s attention, resulting in 19 takes of the song, of which 15 were particularly spirited, although no master resulted from these takes Hendrix moved future studio work on “Freedom” over to his own Electric Lady Studios in late June. The session also featured work on “Valleys Of Neptune,” “Peter Gunn,” and “Catastrophe,” the later two debuting posthumously on War Heroes (Reprise Records, 1972). Making another attack on “Freedom,” Jimi was left unsatisfied and turned his attention back to “Hey Baby (New Rising Sun),” which at this point was styled similarly to the rendition that is currently available on First Rays Of The New Rising Sun (Experience Hendrix/MCA, 1997). Before ending the session, he led the band through an energetic rendition of “Lover Man.”

Freedom Hey Baby Record Plant Recording Studio C

June 16, 1970

Back at Electric Lady Jimi records the master takes of “Night Bird Flying” and “Straight Ahead.” Joined by percussionist Juma Sultan these sessions proved to be among his most productive in the post-Electric Ladyland days. He follows these recordings with takes of “Beginnings,” “Freedom,” and a loose recording simply titled “Messing Around.”

Beginnings Electric Lady Freedom Juma Sultan Night Bird Flying Recording Straight Ahead

June 25, 1970

Building on the momentum of the previous night’s session the group, now joined by Juma Sultan, revisit “Astro Man” before debuting the new ballad, “Drifting.” The session also included work on “Freedom” and “Cherokee Mist.”

Astro Man Cherokee Mist Drifting Freedom Juma Sultan Recording

July 19, 1970

Back at Electric Lady Studios, Jimi once again worked on “Night Bird Flying,” “Straight Ahead,” “Astro Man,” Freedom,” and “Dolly Dagger.”

Astro Man Dolly Dagger Electric Lady Studios Freedom Night Bird Flying Recording Straight Ahead

August 14, 1970

Having returned from Hawaii, Jimi quickly jumped back into the studio where further progress could be made on the recordings from July. Tonight’s session included work on overdubs for “Dolly Dagger” and “Freedom.”

Dolly Dagger Freedom Recording

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