Jimi Hendrix Encyclopedia

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February 10, 1968

After a sound check, the Experience jam with Buddy Miles, Harvey Brooks and David Crosby at the Shrine Auditorium. They play a show at the Shrine later that night, accompanied by Soft Machine, Blue Cheer and The Electric Flag. The set is comprised of: “Are You Experienced?” “The Wind Cries Mary,” “Up From The Skies,” “Red House,” “Wild Thing,” and “Purple Haze.” Peter Tork attends the show and afterward hosts a party at his home in Laurel Canyon. The Jimi Hendrix Experience perform at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles, California on February 10, 1968. Photo: Chuck Boyd / © Authentic Hendrix, LLC

1968 Buddy Miles David Crosb Events February February 10 Harvey Brooks Shrine Auditorium

June 10, 1968

Buddy Miles, Mike Finnigan, Larry Faucette and Freddy Smith joined Hendrix in New York City’s Record Plant studios to record “Rainy Day, Dream Away.” Additional jams were also recorded in the studio, but are merely labeled on the surviving tape box as “Blow.” Hendrix also completes a series of overdubs and mixes for “Voodoo Chile,” “House Burning Down,” and “1983 (A Merman I Should Turn To Be).” Also present in the studio on this date is Velvert Turner.

Buddy Miles Freddy Smith Record Plant Larry Faucette Mike Finnigan Recording

June 11, 1968

It is unknown to what extent any studio efforts on this date had as no multitrack masters or tape copies are known to exist. However, the master list of tape boxes from the Record Plant sesssions refers to a track titled, “Inside Out” as having been recorded on this date. It has been reported that Buddy Miles, Jack Bruce and Jim McCarty may have joined Hendrix in the studio on this date.

Buddy Miles Jack Bruce Record Plant Recording

September 18, 1968

Jimi Hendrix, Noel Redding, Mitch Mitchell, Buddy Miles, Graham Bond and Eric Burdon jam at the Whiskey A Go Go in Hollywood, California.

Buddy Miles California Eric Burdon Graham Bond Hollywood Jimi Hendrix Live Mitch Mitchell Noel Redding Whiskey A Go Go

February 11, 1969

Record Plant New York, N.Y. Destructive Love Jimi oversees a mixing session dedicated to the Buddy Miles Express song “Destructive Love”. The song would later be retitled “I Can See” and included as part of the album Electric Church. It’s Too Bad World Traveler Jam In addition to his work on the Buddy Miles Express recording, Jimi, Miles, and organist Duane Hitchings also focused on new material by Hendrix. “It’s Too Bad” would later be issued as part of the Jimi Hendrix Experience box set.

Buddy Miles Destructive Love new york Record Plant Recording

March 25, 1969

Record Plant New York, N.Y. Jam With John McLaughlin Jam With Jim McCarty John McLaughlin, Jim McCarty, Buddy Miles, and Dave Holland join Jimi Hendrix at the Record Plant.

Band Buddy Miles Jim McCarty John McLaughlin new york Record Plant

April 22, 1969

April 22, 1969 Record Plant, New York Studio Recording 1) Mannish Boy Jimi, Buddy Miles, and Billy Cox dedicate this evening to recording an uptempo remake of Muddy Waters’ classic “Mannish Boy”. The song was later issued as part of the popular album Jimi Hendrix :Blues. This multi-exposed image of Jimi Hendrix recording at Record Plant Studios in New York, New York was taken on April 22, 1969. Photo: Willis Hogan Jr. / © Authentic Hendrix, LLC

billy cox Buddy Miles Mannish Boy new york Record Plant Recording Studio Recording

June 22, 1969

Newport Pop Festival, Devonshire Downs, Northridge, Ca. After a subpar performance with the Experience on Friday evening, Hendrix returned to the festival on Sunday afternoon to jam with Eric Burdon, Buddy Miles, Tracy Nelson, and Mother Earth. Jimi’s enthusiastic participation won over the crowd. The shambling, extended jam session proved to be the highlight of the Sunday slate of Jimi Hendrix is photographed during an afternoon performance / jam on June 22, 1969 at the Newport ‘69 pop festival at DevonshireDowns in Northridge, California. Photo: © Authentic Hendrix, LLC

Buddy Miles Devonshire Downs Eric Burdon Events Mother Earth. Newport Pop Festival Tracy Nelson

November 07, 1969

In a lively session with Hendrix on guitar and Buddy Miles on drums, the two musicians run through a number of takes of “Izabella” plus lay the foundations for “Room Full Of Mirrors.” As John McDermott explains in Jimi Hendrix: Sessions, “Shortly after reel two began, technical problems slowed the pair’s progress. Hendrix, in particular, was bothered by the volume and general quality of the recording being supplied to his headphones. [Engineers] Jack Adams and Dave Ragno feverishly attempted to remedy the situation, but when recording resumed, Jimi’s amplifier started to malfunction, causing his guitar sound to drop out intermittently. This again caused a scramble in the control room. To help salvage the session, engineer Tony Bongiovi was sent for, and, thought he was not listed on the tape box, his distinctive voice can be plainly heard from this point forward.” As the session regrouped and recordings continued, a series of takes of “Room Full Of Mirrors” was laid to tape as was a couple of interesting takes of “Shame, Shame, Shame” (a song which eluded to the strained relationship with his step-brother Leon), plus a gritty rendition of “Ezy Ryder.” It was during these sessions that Alan Douglas deepened his involvement with Hendrix. Although his exact role in the sessions of the 7th is unknown, the tape marked simply marked as being for client, Douglas Records. As Stefan Bright and Douglas increased their control and influence over Hendrix in the studio, their exact involvement and reason for being there seemed puzzling. Tom Erdelyi (second engineer for several Record Plant sessions) explained the changes in the studio in McDermott’s Jimi Hendrix: Sessions. “Douglas and Bright just sort of came in and took over. They were running the show. I was surprised, because I was a fan of the Jimi Hendrix Experience, and no one seemed to understand what Jimi was trying to accomplish. Jimi was such a perfectionist. It seemed as if he was just taking his time, because no tracks were being completed. We thought that Douglas was being patient. “I don’t know whether they had specific titles or not,” continues Erdelyi. “But Stefan Bridge was supposed to be the producer and Alan Douglas the executive producer. There were times when just Stefan Bright was there, but Jimi just played what he wanted, and those guys made comments from the control room.”

Band Buddy Miles Izabella John McDermott Room Full Of Mirrors session

November 20, 1969

Back at the Record Plant several spirited recordings were put to tape this evening, including six takes of Buddy Miles signature track, “Them Changes” plus a dozen meandering takes of “Burning Desire.” Hendrix was troubled by the tone of his guitar, resulting in few memorable highlights from the night’s session. Despite some technical problems the group continued recording, pressing through two takes of “Lover Man,” described here as “Here Comes Your Lover Man,” plus three lack-luster renditions of “Hear My Train A Comin’.” Prior to the session collapsing, Hendrix returned the group to “Burning Desire” and “Them Changes,” both of which were met with genuine disinterest.

Buddy Miles Burning Desire lover man Record Plant Recording Them Changes

November 28, 1969

It is unknown to what nature a session took place on this evening. However, a single quarter-inch, two-track recording was made, likely the source from a session as Baggy’s rehearsal studios. The only reference point is that of a notation of the tape box “Buddy Miles/Billy Cox.”

Baggy’s rehearsal studios billy cox Buddy Miles Recording

January 01, 1970

Ungano’s New York, N.Y. Joined by Elvin Bishop, Buddy Miles and others, Hendrix took part in a jam session at Ungano’s nightclub (210 West 70th Street, New York City). Sacha Reins, a writer for French entertainment magazine Best (Issue 39) who just happened to be in the club during the event, later wrote about the evening. “It is beginning to get quite late, and I tell myself that I have to go. I look to the door and get a big shock. Jimi is there with a black guitar in his hand. Buddy Miles follows him. He shakes the hand of the boss, and I hear him asking if he doesn’t mind them playing a bit. The three telephone booths near the entrance are immediately occupied. We all want to tell a friend that nice things are about to happen. Less than an hour later the club is full. Jimi is onstage and Buddy is looking for a drum stool big enough to support his enormous weight. “A very young guitar player who has been playing for half an hour wants to leave. He doesn’t want to play anymore. Jimi stops him and asks him if they can play together. They try out a rather quick number and Jimi intentionally stays in the background. He waits until the young guitarist regains his confidence. Then he takes his turn. He plays short phrases with long silence intermissions during which one only hears the strong and regular pulsations of Buddy Miles. The silences become shorter and shorter. The phrases are less and less chopped up; they become enchained, stupefying. Jimi had found his groove and under his fingers the strings tell us strange stories that we don’t fully comprehend.”

Buddy Miles Elvin Bishop Events jam session Ungano

January 01, 1970

Fillmore East, New York Two Shows Dawn had arisen over Manhattan by the time the group finally left the venue in the early morning hours of January 1. Incredibly, they returned later on this evening to perform two additional concerts. With the hoopla of the New Year’s Eve festivities behind him, Hendrix centered his attention on realizing a live album from the remaining two performances. Desperate to absolve himself of the bitter legalities, which had hounded him since his return to the United States in June 1967, Hendrix rallied and gave two of the finest performances of his storied career. As the Fillmore audience roared with approval, the Band Of Gypsys left the stage confident that they had validated Jimi’s new music before his loyal followers. “We felt the concerts went well,” remembers Billy Cox. “We felt good doing them and Jimi did all of his powerful techniques he could think of. Then one show he just stayed there and got into it so heavy it was incredible. There were people in the audience with their mouths open.” “His playing is so loud, so fluid and so rife with electronic distortions that it resembles that of no other currently popular performer,” reported Mike Jahn for The New York Times (January 2, 1970). Lead guitarist Jimi Hendrix was once again joined on stage by bassist, Billy Cox and drummer, Buddy Miles for their new collaboration of roaming and experimental sounds. Secure in his standing, Hendrix was comfortable with the Fillmore crowd. During the fourth and final Fillmore concert, the guitarist made light of the group’s limited repertoire immediately prior to the start of “Voodoo Child (Slight Return)”. On another occasion earlier that evening, he even offered his congratulations to the victorious USC Trojans, winners of the Rose Bowl that afternoon. “Jimi enjoyed doing those shows,” explains Billy Cox. “He was enjoying himself because he had complete freedom and freedom is a joyous thing when you’ve got it. We didn’t have any worries about what we could or couldn’t do. These were our first shows. We were pretty rebellious at that age. I guess that’s why we played the music so loud. He didn’t have any restrictions and that is a lot of freedom. You can hear that on every song we played. After the shows were finished, Jimi was quite relieved. He had fulfilled his obligation and was getting this whole [situation] off his back.”

Band of Gypsys billy cox Buddy Miles Fillmore East Live Voodoo Child

January 16, 1970

In a session at the Record Plant, overseen by engineer Bob Hughes and second engineer Dave Ragno, Hendrix crafted a rough sketch of “Send My Love To Linda” which featured Miles on drums and Cox on bass. As the track progressed it extended into a lively extended jam. Additionally, twelve takes of “Paper Airplanes” (AKA “Power Of Soul”) and five takes of “Burning Desire” were also put to tape.

1970 billy cox Bob Hughes Buddy Miles Burning Desire Dave Ragno January 16 Paper Airplanes Power Of Soul Record Plant Recording Send My Love To Linda

January 21, 1970

Juggy Sound, New York Studio Recording As had been the case since mixing sessions began on January 14, Hendrix and Kramer huddled at Juggy Sound to continue their work on Band Of Gypsys. Record Plant, New York Studio Recording Message To Love Stepping Stone Earth Blues Ezy Ryder Following his work at Juggy, Hendrix joined Cox, and Miles at the Record Plant for an extended session that began with fourteen takes of “Power Of Soul” (still referred under the working title of “Crash Landing”) put to tape, and although takes 2, 4, and 6 were complete, no master track was flagged. Recorded three weeks after the group’s legendary Fillmore East concerts, the Band Of Gypsys meticulously crafted this prototypical illustration of sophisticated funk. Hendrix would revisit the track on February 3, 1970, overdubbing guitar parts and creating a rough mix. At that stage, work on “Power Of Soul” drew to a close. Hendrix instead chose to feature a live version of the song as part of Band Of Gypsys, issued in March 1970. The January/February 1970 studio recording of “Power Of Soul” was shelved until the marathon mixing sessions Hendrix staged at Electric Lady Studios in August 1970. As Jimi reviewed the many contenders for his projected double album First Rays Of The New Rising Sun, “Power Of Soul” was treated to a new rough mix, resulting in the unique delay effect heard during the song’s opening. Because “Power Of Soul” had been featured on Band Of Gypsys, Jimi had not reserved a position for the song on First Rays Of The New Rising Sun. Although considered for The Cry Of Love, the first posthumous album of Jimi’s unissued studio material, “Power Of Soul” remained unavailable until a truncated version was overhauled and included as part of the controversial 1975 compilation Crash Landing. The original master was edited and remixed to accommodate overdubs recorded in 1974 by session percussionist Jimmy Maeulen. Lasting only 3:15 and retitled “With The Power”, the elaborate introduction and its two soaring lead guitar solos were scrapped. The version featured on the 1997 compilation South Saturn Delta discards the posthumous additions, restoring the full-length version with all of its regal glory intact. Jimi then presented the evening’s most pleasant surprise, seven takes of “Astro Man”. “This is gonna be fun!” laughed Jimi before launching into a enthusiastic rendition of “Astro Man”, his comic cartoon fable. The song’s inspiration was simple, drawing its roots from Jimi’s love for animated cartoons. “That’s what ‘Astro Man’ was all about,” laughs Cox. “We used to love watching cartoons at his apartment. He enjoyed Mighty Mouse and especially loved Rocky and Bullwinkle.” Take seven would later be featured as part of The Jimi Hendrix Experience box set. Jimi closed the evening with a single, unsuccessful attempt at realizing a basic track for the promising “Valleys Of Neptune.” In other news outside the recording studio, the January 21 issue of Variety magazine announced the upcoming Isle Of Wight Festival of Music, a five-day musical extravaganza slated for August on the small island located off the south coast of England. Of the event, Variety explains, “The first two days will be a film fest. It is hoped to premier a couple of films of the Easy Rider genre [Murray Lerner’s acclaimed Festival!, a documentary about the Newport Folk Festival, was one of the films scheduled]. The remainder will be a conventional progressive pop bash with about 30 acts taking part. Policy is to not book more than two big names as crowd pullers as they tend to overshadow other acts. No bookings have yet been made.”

Astro Man billy cox Buddy Miles extended session jam sessions Jimi Hendrix Recording

February 16, 1970

Juggy Sound, New York Studio Recording Record Plant, New York Studio Recording On this evening, Hendrix traveled to the Record Plant after mixing sessions at Juggy Sound had concluded. Upon his arrival, an informal jam session with Buddy Miles ensued. Two instrumental attempts at “Blue Suede Shoes” were put to tape. Later, Hendrix put forward an early version of what would become to “Hey Baby (New Rising Sun).” Singing live and supported only by drums and percussion, Hendrix wove gorgeous touches of Spanish flamenco styling within the arrangement. An impish stab at Eddie Cochran’s “Summertime Blues”—a favorite of the guitarist’s when he was a teenager in Seattle—was followed by a funky original work reminiscent of “Day Tripper.” Soon thereafter Billy Cox and Mitch Mitchell arrived. Buddy Miles departed and work began on “Freedom”. This recording, issued on The Jimi Hendrix Experience box set, is dramatically different than the version now included as part of First Rays Of The New Rising Sun. Most notably, Jimi devised an inventive, extended introduction and, in contrast to his efforts the previous summer with Gypsys Sun & Rainbows, skillfully integrated the percussion effort of Juma Sultan.

billy cox Blue Suede Shoes Buddy Miles Eddie Cochran Hey Baby Juggy Sound Mitch Mitchell Record Plant Recording

February 16, 1970

Buddy Miles and Juma Sultan join Hendrix at the Record Plant where two recordings of “Blue Suede Shoes” were put to tape. Later, Hendrix sung live, giving a beautiful flamenco-styled flavor to “Hey Baby (Land Of The New Rising Sun).” Afterwards Hendrix breaks into a jam playing “Summertime Blues” which is then followed by “Day Tripper.”

1970 Blue Suede Shoes Buddy Miles Day Tripper February 16 Hey Baby Juma Sultan Land Of The New Rising Sun Releases Summertime Blues the Record Plant

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