Jimi Hendrix Encyclopedia

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January 11, 1967

Looking to get something new to market following their debut “Hey Joe,” Chas Chandler brought The Experience to DeLane Lea Studios in London to commence work on their next songs. This session included the basic track for “Purple Haze,” which was recorded in merely four hours. Additional recordings including “The Wind Cries Mary,” “51st Anniversary,” “The Wind Cries Mary” and “Burning Of The Midnight Lamp” were also completed.

Tape Log: Purple Haze // 51st Anniversary // Third Stone From The Sun // Fire // The Wind Cries Mary

1967 51st Anniversary De Lane Lea Studios January January 11 London Purple Haze Recording Studio Recordings The Burning Of The Midnight Lamp The Wind Cries Mary United Kingdom

February 03, 1967

Tape Log: Purple Haze The studio sessions on February 3rd marked The Experience’s first foray into Olympic Studios and their first time working with engineer Eddie Kramer. This initial session saw Hendrix return to the January 11th masters for “Purple Haze” to record some additional overdubs. This initial “Purple Haze” session at Olympic foreshadowed just how creative and cutting edge the team of Hendrix, Chas Chandler and Eddie Kramer would become in the months that followed. This recording session also marked one one of the first times that Hendrix recorded in the studio with Roger Mayer’s experimental Octavia effects pedal.

1967 February February 3 Greater London London Olympic Studios Recording Studio Recordings United Kingdom

February 07, 1967

Jimi Hendrix returns to Olympic Studios to complete further work on “Purple Haze” alongside Chas Chandler and Eddie Kramer. Noel Redding contributes some of the background vocals during this session.
Tape Log: Purple Haze

1967 Barnes February February 7 Greater London Jimi Hendrix Olympic Studios Recording Studio Recordings United Kingdom

February 08, 1967

The Experience returned to Olympic Studios where the group completed a final mix on their new single “Purple Haze.” Afterwards, the trio revisited the four-track master for “Fire” which was previously worked on at DeLane Lea Studios. In the end, the original DeLane Lea track was basically replaced with new work. “Foxey Lady” received similar treatment, this time revisiting the December 13, 1966 tapes that were conceived at CBS Studios. By the end of the night, a final mix was in hand.
Tape Log: Purple Haze // Fire // Foxey Lady

1967 Barnes February February 8 Greater London Olympic Studios Recording Studio Recordings United Kingdom

February 20, 1967

The Experience head back to De Lane Lea Studios to continue work on their debut album. Recordings this evening focused on “I Don’t Live Today,” and by the session’s end, Chas Chandler had a working master in hand.
Tape Log: I Don’t Live Today

1967 De Lane Lea Studios February February 20 London Recording Studio Recordings United Kingdom

March 01, 1967

Back at De Lane Lea Studios, The Experience worked on “Like A Rolling Stone” but struggled to record something that everyone liked.
Tape Log: Like A Rolling Stone

1967 Studio Recordings De Lane Lea Studios London March March 1 Recording the experience United Kingdom

March 29, 1967

The Experience returned to De Lane Lea Studios in London to focus attention on “Manic Depression.” In between takes of “Manic Depression,” Hendrix lead the band through an instrumental take of Michel Polnareff’s popular 1966 single, “La Poupée qui Fait Non.”
Tape Log: Manic Depression // La Poupée qui Fait Non

1967 De Lane Lea Studios London March March 29 Recording Studio Recordings the experience United Kingdom

April 03, 1967

The Experience returned to London’s Olympic Studios to continue work on their debut album. This significant session resulted in new recordings, overdubs on some unfinished compositions and final mixes for several tracks.

The group focused their initial attention to recording “Highway Chile,” with the 8th and final take being flagged as the master. Work then began on “Waterfall” (as originally marked on the tape box). Studio engineer Eddie Kramer later prepared a four-to-four mix of the 4th take during which time the song was retitled as “May This Be Love.”

Hendrix then focused his attention on “Title #3” and later “Title #4” which eventually became “Are You Experienced?” Despite the the complexities of these recordings, the full song “Are You Experienced?” was completed start-to-finish in this one session.

Before the session came to a close, final mixes were prepared for “May This Be Love,” “Are You Experienced?” and “I Don’t Live Today.”

The stunning initial take of “Title #4” [“Are You Experienced?”] was included on the 2010 Box Set West Coast Seattle Boy as was one of the outtakes of “May This Be Love.”

Tape Log: Highway Chile // Waterfall [aka May This Be Love] // Title #3 // Title #4 [aka Are You Experienced?] // I Don’t Live Today

1967 April April 3 City of London Greater London Olympic Studios Recording Studio Recordings United Kingdom

April 04, 1967

Returning to London’s Olympic Studios, an additional four-track-to-four-track reduction mix was created for “Are You Experienced?”

Later the group revisited the January 11, 1967 recordings of “Third Stone From The Sun” before redirecting attention to creating both mono and stereo mixes of “Highway Chile.” The mono mix was eventually held back and included alongside a stereo mix of “The Wind Cries Mary” as the trio’s third single in the United Kingdom.

Before the session was completed, Hendrix focused once again on the work completed in December 1966 on the song, “Love Or Confusion” which resulted in a final mix being produced and later included on the debut release of Are You Experienced.

Before the session ended, the group worked on the B.B. King inspired “Here He Comes,” before putting that aside to focus on complete mixes of songs they had earmarked for the new album.”

Tape Log: Are You Experienced? // Third Stone From The Sun // Highway Chile // Love Or Confusion // Here He Comes

1967 April April 4 City of London Greater London Olympic Studios Recording Studio Recordings United Kingdom

April 05, 1967

Chas Chandler had lacquers created for both mono and stereo mixes of “The Wind Cries Mary” and a mono version of “Highway Chile” which were given to Track Records so manufacturing of The Experience’s forthcoming single could begin.

Tape Log: The Wind Cries Mary // Highway Chile

1967 April April 5 Chas Chandler Greater London Kensington Recording Rye Muse Studios Studio Recordings United Kingdom

April 10, 1967

Returning to Olympic Studios, Manager Chas Chandler guided The Experience back through the April 4th recordings of “Third Stone From The Sun.”

The session featured two non-musical tracks called described on the tape boxes as “Wild Chat” and “Noises” which featured Hendrix and Chandler talking through a variety of science fiction inspired passages. “Noises” featured Hendrix talking about the markings that Engineer George Chkiantz had made on the tape boxes that evening.

Several segments of these recordings, including the classic, “and you’ll never hear surf music again…” were incorporated into the final mix of “Third Stone From The Sun.”

Tape Log: Third Stone From The Sun // Wild Chat // Noises

1967 April 10 Chas Chandler City of London Greater London Olympic Studios Recording Studio Recordings United Kingdom

April 25, 1967

Beginning late in the evening of April 24th and through the early hours of April 25th, Hendrix joined Chas Chandler and Eddie Kramer at Olympic Studios to work on final mixes (stereo and mono) for several songs slated for inclusion on Are You Experienced, including: “Foxey Lady,” “Manic Depression,” “May This Be Love,” “Fire,” “Remember,” “Third Stone From The Sun,” and “Love Or Confusion.”

Tape Log: Foxey Lady // Manic Depression // May This Be Love // Fire // Remember // Third Stone From The Sun // Love Or Confusion

1967 April April 25 Chas Chandler City of London eddie kramer Greater London Jimi Hendrix Olympic Studios Recording Studio Recordings United Kingdom

January 20, 1968

The band is photographed for Top Pop magazine. Under the direction of Paul McCartney, Hendrix records tracks for the self-titled, McGough and McGear (EMI Parlophone, PCS 7047, 1968) album at DeLane Lea Studios.

Jimi Hendrix Experience McGough and McGear Paul McCartney photograph Recording Top Pop magazine

January 21, 1968

The Experience returns to Olympic Studios to record “All Along The Watchtower,” which features Dave Mason on 12-string acoustic guitar and Brian Jones on percussion. The session started with Jones contributing on piano, but these recordings were not released.

All Along The Watchtower Brian Jones Dave Mason Olympic Studios Recording the experience

January 26, 1968

The band records “Tax Free” and “Little One” at Olympic Studios.

Little One Olympic Studios Recording tax free

January 28, 1968

“Mushy Name” and “Tax Free” are recorded at Olympic Studios.

Mushy Name Olympic Studios Recording tax free

February 13, 1968

Jimi Hendrix records a series of songs at Sound Center Studios (247 West 46th Street) in New York City. Recordings on this date include “My Friend” which features Ken Pine (12-string), Paul Caruso (harmonica), Jimmy Mayes (drums) and Stephen Stills (piano) accompanying Hendrix playing a bass guitar. The song would be later released on the posthumous album The Cry Of Love in 1971. Noel Redding joined the session later in the evening bringing rise to an instrumental workout of “Little Miss Lover” and while Hendrix records a version of “1983…(A Merman I Should Turn To Be).”

Jimmy Mayes Ken Pine Little Miss Lover My Friend New York City Noel Redding Paul Caruso Recording Sound Center Studios Stephen Stills

April 08, 1968

At New York’s Drake Hotel (East 56th Street), Hendrix records 36-minutes of demos in his room, including: “Long Hot Summer Night,” “1983…(A Merman I Should Turn To Be),” “Moon Turn The Tides … Gently, Gently Away,” “Angel,” “Cherokee Mist,” “Hear My Train A Comin’,” “Voodoo Chile,” and “Gypsy Eyes.” Eleven minutes of recordings including “Angel,” “1983…(A Merman I Should Turn To Be),” and “Moon Turn The Tides … Gently, Gently Away” are broadcast on the Bob Harris Show on BBC Radio 1 on November 13, 1992.

BBC Radio Bob Harris Show Drake Hotel record Recording

April 18, 1968

The Experience record “Long Hot Summer Night” at The Record Plant (321 West 44th Street) in New York. Al Kooper later overdubs piano on the track. It was during this session that Hendrix gave Kooper his Stratocaster, (See Issue #5, page 6, ‘None Take Hendrix Strat’ for details on recent Auction featuring this guitar).

Al Kooper Long Hot Summer Night new york Recording the experience the Record Plant

April 20, 1968

For three days, the band rehearses and records “Little Miss Strange” at The Record Plant. The track is first recorded under the title, “Lilacs For Captain Curry’s Coffin” (or “Little Miss Strange Test Session”). On the second day of recordings, the song takes it’s final naming incarnation, “Little Miss Strange.”

Lilacs For Captain Curry’s Coffin Little Miss Strange Recording the Record Plant

April 22, 1968

In addition to the final recordings for Redding’s “Little Miss Strange,” five recordings of “1983… (A Merman I Should Turn To Be)” were laid to tape. Overdubs a rough mixes were also developed for “Three Little Bears” and “Gypsy Eyes.”

1983… (A Merman I Should Turn To Be) Gypsy Eyes Little Miss Strange Recording Three Little Bears

April 23, 1968

Redding’s four-hour sessions at The Record Plant resulted in the addition of additional acoustic guitars to “Little Miss Strange.”

Little Miss Strange Recording Redding the Record Plant

April 26, 1968

Back at The Record Plant, this emotionally trying session for the group resulted in several takes of “Gypsy Eyes” for which little progress was seen.

Gypsy Eyes Recording the Record Plant

April 28, 1968

Hendrix and Mitchell record 41 takes of “Gypsys Eyes” at The Record Plant. Later that night Redding prepares a rough mix of “Little Miss Strange” and also additional rhythm parts onto the April 20th master tape of “Little Miss Strange.”

Gypsys Eyes Little Miss Strange Recording Redding the Record Plant

May 01, 1968

The Experience work at the Record Plant in New York City. During the session, the group creates the basic track for “House Burning Down” and complete the recordings of “Gypsy Eyes” with take 5 being marked as ‘complete.’ The group also revisit “Tax Free” with Hendrix playing his guitar through a Leslie speaker on two of the takes; the later being marked as ‘use.’

Gypsy Eyes House Burning Down New York City Record Plant Recording the experience

May 02, 1968

Recording for “Three Little Bears” would take place at the Record Plant, where Steve Winwood, Jack Casady and a host of others visited the group. Although Hendrix originally coined the title, “Cherokee Mist” for the session, he later settled on “Three Little Bears” as its final working title. Throughout the session, Jimi developed a jazzy rhythm pattern that would eventually become “South Saturn Delta.” As the session progressed, Hendrix and bassist, Noel Redding get into a heated argument about the number of people in the studio. In his autobiography, Are You Experienced? Redding says, “There were tons of people in the studio – you couldn’t even move. It was a party not a session. He just said, ‘Relax man…’ I’d been relaxing for months, so I relaxed my way right out the place, not caring if I ever saw him again.” Taking a break from the session Hendrix leads an entourage to their local hangout at the Scene Club for some fun. Afterwards, Hendrix, Mitch Mitchell, Eddie Kramer, Winwood, Casady, Larry Coryell and others, return to the Record Plant to jam. These jams would become the foundation of “Voodoo Chile.” A number of recordings with Winwood and Casady participating were laid to tape on this night, with 3 of the takes being fused together as “Voodoo Chile Blues,” which was released on MCA’s 1994 release – :Blues.

Casady eddie kramer Hendrix Jack Casady Larry Coryell Mitch Mitchell Noel Redding Record Plant Recording Steve Winwood Three Little Bears Winwood

May 04, 1968

Larry Coryell (playing 12-string guitar) joins Noel Redding, at this early morning session at the Record Plant for the recording of his self-penned number, “Little, Little Girl.” A rough mix of the recording was also produced during the session. Later, Hendrix and Kramer prepare rough mixes of “Voodoo Child (Slight Return)” and “House Burning Down.”

Larry Coryell Little Little Girl Noel Redding Record Plant Recording Voodoo Child

May 05, 1968

Returning once again to the Record Plant, the Experience prepare a rough mix of “House Burning Down” but later mark it ‘Don’t Use’ and discard it. Overdubs, including Jimi’s lead guitar part for Redding’s “Little Miss Strange” are completed, as is the final mix of the track.

House Burning Down Little Miss Strange Record Plant Recording the experience

May 08, 1968

The Experience complete rough mixes for “Three Little Bears,” “Voodoo Chile,” and “Long Hot Summer Night” during sessions at the Record Plant. Jimi also returned to the April 22 recordings of “1983 (A Merman I Should Turn To Be)” by adding a series of new recordings that were later added as edit sections to create a single, unified master. With Hendrix taking the music in his own direction, Chas Chandler stepped down as the producer for the Electric Ladyland project. “Both I and the group were exhausted,” explained Chandler in an interview with John McDermott for the book Jimi Hendrix Sessions. “I had spent three years with the Animals, and the next day I was working with Hendrix. I had put in as much time on the job as Hendrix, Mitchell, and Redding – plus my time with the Animals. The last thing I wanted to be doing was fighting with Jimi in the studio and then (Michael) Jeffrey in the office. I just walked away.” In a separate session, also at the Record Plant, Noel Redding worked recorded “How Can I Live” with engineer Gary Kellgren.

Electric Ladyland Long Hot Summer Night Record Plant Recording the experience Three Little Bears Voodoo Chile

May 17, 1968

The Experience completed an overdub and mixdown session for “Gypsy Eyes” at the Record Plant.

Gypsy Eyes Record Plant Recording the experience

May 20, 1968

Hendrix reportedly jams with Noel Redding, Frank Zappa, Arthur Brown, Steve Paul and Jimmy Carl Black at the Wreck Bar in the Castaways Hotel in Miami, Florida during the early morning hours. Redding boards a plane to return to London later that day.

Arthur Brown Castaways Hotel Florida Frank Zappa Jimmy Carl Black Miami Noel Redding Recording Steve Paul Wreck Bar

May 31, 1968

Hendrix jams with members of Traffic, including Dave Mason, Chris Wood, Steve Winwood, Trevor Burton, Carl Wayne and Vic Briggs at Hallenstadion. Chris Wood records the jam on his portable tape recorder. The second night of performances for the Pop-Montserkonzert take place at Hallenstadion. Afterwards, Keith Altham interviews Hendrix for the June 8 edition of New Musical Express.

ave Mason Carl Wayne Chris Wood Recording Steve Winwood Trevor Burton Vic Briggs

June 04, 1968

The Experience rehearse for their upcoming recordings for Dusty Springfield’s television program, It Must Be Dusty at ITV Television Studios in Borehamwood, Hertfordshire.

Borehamwood Dusty Springfield Hertfordshire It Must Be Dusty ITV Television Studios Recording

June 10, 1968

Buddy Miles, Mike Finnigan, Larry Faucette and Freddy Smith joined Hendrix in New York City’s Record Plant studios to record “Rainy Day, Dream Away.” Additional jams were also recorded in the studio, but are merely labeled on the surviving tape box as “Blow.” Hendrix also completes a series of overdubs and mixes for “Voodoo Chile,” “House Burning Down,” and “1983 (A Merman I Should Turn To Be).” Also present in the studio on this date is Velvert Turner.

Buddy Miles Freddy Smith Record Plant Larry Faucette Mike Finnigan Recording

June 11, 1968

It is unknown to what extent any studio efforts on this date had as no multitrack masters or tape copies are known to exist. However, the master list of tape boxes from the Record Plant sesssions refers to a track titled, “Inside Out” as having been recorded on this date. It has been reported that Buddy Miles, Jack Bruce and Jim McCarty may have joined Hendrix in the studio on this date.

Buddy Miles Jack Bruce Record Plant Recording

June 17, 1968

A series of overdubs and remixes of “Gypsys Eyes” are completed with Eddie Kramer at the Record Plant.

eddie kramer Gypsys Eyes Record Plant Recording

June 28, 1968

The final mixes for “Rainy Day, Dream Away” are prepared are the Record Plant. It is decided that two separate songs can be created from this one recording – resulting in the original track being split into “Rainy Day, Dream Away” and “Still Raining, Still Dreaming.” Hendrix attends the Soul Together – the Martin Luther King Memorial Concert at Madison Square Garden in Manhattan. Jimi donates $5,000 to the memorial fund.

Dream Away Rainy Day Rainy Day Dream Away Record Plant Recording Still Dreaming Still Raining

June 29, 1968

Progress is made during the mixing of, “At Last … The Beginning,” which later becomes “…And The Gods Made Love” during this session at the Record Plant.

And The Gods Made Love At Last … The Beginning Record Plant Recording

July 07, 1968

At the Record Plant, Eddie Kramer experiments with the crossfades that will link the first three songs, “Have You Ever Been (To Electric Ladyland),” “Crosstown Traffic,” and “Voodoo Chile” together for the Electric Ladyland album.

crossfades Crosstown Traffic eddie kramer Have You Ever Been Record Plant Recording Voodoo Chile

July 24, 1968

Eddie Kramer prepared a rough mix of “Gypsy Eyes” at the Record Plant, but marks the tape box, ‘check with Jimi for usage.’

eddie kramer Gypsy Eyes Record Plant Recording

July 26, 1968

In addition to a rough mix of “House Burning Down” being completed at the Record Plant. Gary Kellgren engineers some overdubs and a rough mix of “Long Hot Summer Night.”

Gary Kellgren House Burning Down Long Hot Summer Night Recording

July 29, 1968

Gary Kellgren works on a mix of “Long Hot Summer Night” in an early morning studio session at his Record Plant studios. The Jimi Hendrix Experience receive Gold RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) awards for sales of more than $500,000 on their debut release, Are You Experienced. The presentation is made to Jimi, Mitch and Noel at Warner Brothers’ offices in Los Angeles.

Gary Kellgren Gold RIAA Long Hot Summer Night Record Plant Recording The Jimi Hendrix Experience

August 07, 1968

A mid-day session at the Record Plant yields some additional mixes of “Long Hot Summer Night,” none of which are tagged as a final version. Linda McCartney photographs the Experience in New York’s Central Park. Several small children are gathered and hang-out with Jimi, Mitch, and Noel on the Alice In Wonderland statue in the heart of Park. Hendrix later chooses these photographs for the cover of the forthcoming Electric Ladyland double-LP.

Jimi Linda McCartney Long Hot Summer Night Mitch Noel Record Plant Recording

August 27, 1968

The Experience return to the Record Plant to put the finishing touches on their forthcoming release, Electric Ladyland. Work on “Gypsy Eyes” on this night focused on the flanging effects, which had studio engineers Eddie Kramer and Gary Kellgren physically putting pressure on the flange reel of the tape deck during recording. While Hendrix and Kramer labored over the master tape for Electric Ladyland, Kallgren, Mitchell and Redding recorded twelve-takes of Redding’s own composition, “How Can I Live,” which later appeared on the debut release for Redding’s new band, Fat Mattress. With only one more track required to complete the album, the group turned to Earl King’s “Come On (Part One)” to fill the final track. After fourteen takes, the final take was selected as the basic track for the album. Electric Ladyland was now complete.

eddie kramer Electric Ladyland Gary Kellgren Gypsy Eyes Record Plant Recording the experience

October 21, 1968

TTG Studios N. Hollywood, California Jimi Hendrix is photographed during studio recording sessions at TTG Studios in Hollywood, California in October 1968. Photo: Chuck Boyd / © Authentic Hendrix, LLC

California North Hollywood Recording TTG Studios

December 03, 1968

Mitch Mitchell and Noel Redding return to London for the Christmas Holidays. During this time, Redding teamed up with Jim Leverton and Eric Dillon to record 12 tracks for the upcoming Fat Mattress album.

Eric Dillon Fat Mattress album Jim Leverton Mitch Mitchell Noel Redding Recording

December 12, 1968

Wembley Studios London, England Yer Blues Mitch Mitchell joined John Lennon, Keith Richards, and Eric Clapton to take part in the Rolling Stones Great Rock & Roll Circus television special. The group, which Lennon dubbed the Dirty Mac, performed a version of “Yer Blues”. This legendary recording remained unreleased for more than two decades before ABKCO Records released the program on CD and home video.

1968 ABKCO Records December 12 Dirty Mac England Eric Clapton John Lennon Keith Richards London Mitch Mitchell Recording Rolling Stones Great Rock & Roll Circus television special unreleased Wembley Studios Yer Blues

January 05, 1969

January 5-6, 1969 Polydor Studios London, England It is believed that Hendrix contributed a lead guitar overdub to the Eire Apparent’s “Rock ‘n’ Roll Band” on either the 5th or 6th of January. The engineer for the session was Carlos Olms.

Carlos Olms England London Polydor Studios Recording Rock ‘N’ Roll Band

February 11, 1969

Record Plant New York, N.Y. Destructive Love Jimi oversees a mixing session dedicated to the Buddy Miles Express song “Destructive Love”. The song would later be retitled “I Can See” and included as part of the album Electric Church. It’s Too Bad World Traveler Jam In addition to his work on the Buddy Miles Express recording, Jimi, Miles, and organist Duane Hitchings also focused on new material by Hendrix. “It’s Too Bad” would later be issued as part of the Jimi Hendrix Experience box set.

Buddy Miles Destructive Love new york Record Plant Recording

February 14, 1969

Olympic Studios London, England Midnight Lightning

England London Midnight Lightning Olympic Studios Recording

February 16, 1969

Olympic Studios London, England Slow (Ezy Ryder) Room Full Of Mirrors Shame, Shame, Shame Crying Blue Rain Tax Free Sunshine Of Your Love Here He Comes (Lover Man)

England London Olympic Studios Recording

February 17, 1969

Olympic Studios London, England Fire I Don’t Live Today Spanish Castle Magic Hear My Train A Comin’ Lover Man Red House The Experience recorded an inspired rehearsal for their February 18 Albert Hall performance on this night. Two recordings from this session, “Spanish Castle Magic” and “Hear My Train A Comin’” were highlights of the Jimi Hendrix Experience box set.

England London Olympic Studios Recording

February 22, 1969

February 22, 1969 Olympic Studios London, England Hound Dog Go My Own Way

England Go My Own Way Hound Dog London Olympic Studios Recording

February 26, 1969

February 26, 1969 Olympic Studios London, England Gypsy Blood Jam With Horns Noel’s Tune

England London Olympic Studios Recording

March 18, 1969

Record Plant New York, N.Y. Star Spangled Banner Hey Gypsy Boy Jimi Hendrix records “Star Spangled Banner” and “Gypsy Boy” at the Record Plant. “Star Spangled Banner” was included as part of the Jimi Hendrix Experience box set.

Hey Gypsy Boy new york Record Plant Recording Star Spangled Banner

April 01, 1969

Olmstead Studios, New York Studio Recording 1) Bleeding Heart 2) Guitar Idea 3) Ezy Ryder 4) Midnight 5) Bleeding Heart 6) Villanova Junction Blues 7) Jam Following a difficult and unproductive series of sessions at Olympic Studios in February 1969, the Experience did not return to the recording studio as a unit until April, when they gathered with engineer Eddie Kramer at New York’s Olmstead Studios to try and recapture their momentum.

new york Olmstead Studios Recording Studio Recording

April 02, 1969

Olmstead Studios, New York Studio Recording 1) Jam 2) Hear My Train A’ Comin’ 3) Ezy Ryder

Ezy Ryder hear my train a comin' Jam New York. Studio Recording Olmstead Studios Recording

April 03, 1969

Olmstead Studios, New York Studio Recording 1)Midnight 2)Trash Man Takes of the extended instrumental workouts “Midnight” and “Trash Man” were the most promising songs to emerge from these early April 1969 Olmstead sessions. “Midnight” had begun to take form two months earlier at the February 1969 sessions at Olympic Studios. The song was originally titled “Midnight Lightning” before Jimi shortened it simply to “Midnight”. “Midnight” is now available as part of the 1998 album South Saturn Delta. A heavily truncated version of “Trash Man”, filled out with posthumously recorded overdubs, was issued part of the controversial [and long since deleted] 1975 album Midnight Lightning.

Midnight new york Olmstead Studios Recording Studio Recording Trash Man

April 04, 1969

April 4, 1969 Olmstead Studios, New York Studio Recording 1)Trash Man

new york Olmstead Studios Recording Studio Recording Trash Man

April 06, 1969

Record Plant Studios, New York Studio Recording 1) Jam With Electric Sitar 2) Ships Passing In The Night 3) Ezy Ryder Working without Mitch and Noel, Jimi enjoyed a night of jamming and experimentation. The evening’s highlight came when Jimi recorded an extended, untitled jam session playing an electric sitar, an instrument given to him by its inventor, Vinnie Bell.

new york Record Plant Studios Recording Studio Recording Vinnie Bell

April 07, 1969

Record Plant Studios, New York Studio Recording 1) Stone Free 2) Hear My Train A Comin’ 3) Lullaby For The Summer Jimi revisited “Stone Free”, his first ever Experience composition. This new rendition showcased a more sophisticated arrangement than that of the November 1966 recording which had served as the b-side for “Hey Joe”. Pleased with the group’s progress, Hendrix recorded lead guitar and vocal overdubs during two subsequent sessions on April 9 and 14. While not released during Jimi’s lifetime, this version of “Stone Free” was issued as part of the Jimi Hendrix Experience box set. Work was also completed on “Hear My Train A Comin” although no final masters were achieved. Jimi also attempted to further develop “Lullaby For The Summer”, which would later evolve as “Ezy Ryder”.

new york Record Plant Studios Recording Studio Recording

April 09, 1969

Record Plant Studios, New York Studio Recording 1)Hear My Train A Comin’ 2)Stone Free New attempts were made at “Hear My Train A Comin’” while Jimi added overdubs to the “Stone Free” master begun on April 7.

new york Record Plant Studios Recording Studio Recording

April 14, 1969

Record Plant Studios, New York Studio Recording 1 ) Solo Guitar 2 ) Jam With Unknown Bass & Drummer 3 ) Jam With Mitch & Noel 4 ) Jam With Percussion 5 ) Bass Jam 6 ) Sunshine Of Your Love 7 ) Ships Passing Through The Night 8 ) Jams With Larry Young and Buddy Miles A night filled with spirited jam sessions. The evening was capped off with a superb, jazz tinged workout with Buddy Miles and organist Larry Young. A portion of this jam was later issued as part of the [now deleted] 1980 compilation Nine To The Universe.

new york Nine To The Universe Record Plant Studios Recording Studio Recording

April 17, 1969

Record Plant Studios, New York Studio Recording 1) Keep On Groovin’

Keep On Groovin new york Record Plant Studios Recording Studio Recording

April 22, 1969

April 22, 1969 Record Plant, New York Studio Recording 1) Mannish Boy Jimi, Buddy Miles, and Billy Cox dedicate this evening to recording an uptempo remake of Muddy Waters’ classic “Mannish Boy”. The song was later issued as part of the popular album Jimi Hendrix :Blues. This multi-exposed image of Jimi Hendrix recording at Record Plant Studios in New York, New York was taken on April 22, 1969. Photo: Willis Hogan Jr. / © Authentic Hendrix, LLC

billy cox Buddy Miles Mannish Boy new york Record Plant Recording Studio Recording

May 06, 1969

Record Plant, New York Studio Recording Jimi returned to New York and booked an evening session at the Record Plant dedicated to playbacks of previously recorded material and mixing. His session concluded at 2:30 a.m. and the guitarist left the studio to go to the Scene nightclub.

new york Record Plant Recording Studio Recording

May 07, 1969

Record Plant, New York Studio Recording 1) “Jam #1” 2) “Jam #2” 3) “Ships Passing Through The Night” 4) “Jam Part II” [“The Things I Used To Do”] In the early morning hours of May 7, Jimi returned from the nearby Scene Club with Steve Stills and Johnny Winter in tow. The three guitarists enjoyed a lengthy jam session which culminated in a rollicking rendition of Guitar Slim’s “The Things I Used To Do”. Memorial Coliseum, Tuscaloosa, Alabama With Fat Mattress, Cat Mother & The All Night Newsboys Later that afternoon, Hendrix joined Mitchell, Redding and his road crew to fly to Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The group checked into the Ramada Inn in Tuscaloosa prior to performing that evening at the Memorial Coliseum. Jimi Hendrix is photographed during The Experience’s performance at Memorial Coliseum in Tuscaloosa, Alabama on May 7, 1969. Photo: Marshal Haglar / © Authentic Hendrix, LLC

new york Record Plant Recording Ships Passing Through The Night Studio Recording

May 13, 1969

Record Plant, New York Studio Recording 1) Keep On Groovin’ 2) Jam Session 3) Solo Demos A long evening dedicated solely to jamming. Jimi was joined by bassist Billy Cox, organist Sharon Layne, an unnamed percussionist, and a second guitarist known only as Sean.

billy cox jam session Keep On Groovin Recording Sharon Layne Solo Demos

May 14, 1969

Record Plant, New York Studio Recording 1) Freedom 2) Jam 292 3) Untitled Jam 4) Horn & Piano Jam Backed by Mitch Mitchell, bassist Billy Cox, and organist Sharon Layne, Jimi recorded “Jam 292”, which was later posthumously issued as part of Jimi Hendrix :Blues. Later that evening, the group was joined by an unnamed trumpet player who contributed to series of untitled instrumental jams before the session concluded.

billy cox Freedom Horn & Piano Jam Jam 292 Jimi Mitch Mitchell Recording Sharon Layne Untitled Jam

May 15, 1969

Record Plant, New York Studio Recording 1) Untitled Jam 2) Blues Jam 3) Instrumental 4) Stone Free 5) With The Power Of God 6) Slow Blues A marathon session at the Record Plant with Jimi joined by Mitch Mitchell, Billy Cox, Sharon Layne, and an unnamed trumpet player. The group was also joined briefly by the horn section from The Buddy Miles Express.

Blues Jam Instrumental Recording Slow Blues Stone Free Untitled Jam With The Power Of God

May 16, 1969

Record Plant, New York Studio Recording 1) “Stone Free” Instrumental takes with Billy, Jimi & Mitch In the early morning hours, Hendrix, Mitchell, and Cox recorded a number at attempts of a remake of “Stone Free”. No final masters were achieved however. Baltimore Civic Center, Baltimore, Maryland With Buddy Miles Express, Cat Mother & The All Night Newsboys Set List: Lover Man Hear My Train A Comin’ Fire Red House I Don’t Live Today Foxey Lady Spanish Castle Magic Purple Haze Sunshine Of Your Love Voodoo Child (Slight Return) The Experience travel to Baltimore, Maryland where they perform at the Civic Center.

Cox Hendrix Mitchell Recording Stone Free

May 21, 1969

Record Plant, New York Studio Recording 1) Hear My Train A Comin’ 2) Villanova Junction 3) Earth Blues 4) Untitled Blues 5) Jam With Buddy Miles On Guitar 6) Earth Blues 7) Bleeding Heart Jimi returned to the Record Plant to record with Billy Cox, Buddy Miles, and an unnamed conga player. Over the course of this lengthy session, the group cut a superb rendition of the Elmore James blues standard “Bleeding Heart”. This recording was later edited and issued as part of Jimi Hendrix: Blues.

Bleeding Heart Earth Blues hear my train a comin' Jam With Buddy Miles On Guitar Record Plant Recording Untitled Blues Villanova Junction

May 22, 1969

Record Plant, New York Studio Recording 1) Message From Nine To The Universe For the second consecutive evening, Jimi was joined by Cox, Miles, and an unnamed percussionist. Their focus was centered on “Message From Nine To The Universe” an early hybrid of “Earth Blues” and “Message To Love”. A heavily edited version of this take was later issued as part of the [now deleted] 1980 compilation Nine To The Universe.

Earth Blues Message From Nine To The Universe Message To Love Record Plant Recording Studio Recording

June 08, 1969

Wally Heider Recording, Los Angeles, Ca. Studio 3, Mixing Eddie Kramer began mixing sessions for a proposed Experience live album. Among the work completed on this day are mixes and edits of “Star Spangled Banner” (San Diego 5/24/69), “Purple Haze” (San Diego 5/24/69), and “Little Wing” (Royal Albert Hall 2/24/69).

eddie kramer Experience live Little Wing Purple Haze Recording Star Spangled Banner

June 10, 1969

Wally Heider Recording, Los Angeles, Ca. Studio 3, Mixing Eddie Kramer continued work on several live recordings. Final mixes of “I Don’t Live Today” (Los Angeles Forum 4/26/69) and “Hear My Train A Comin’” (Royal Albert Hall 2/24/69) were prepared.

eddie kramer i don't live today Los Angeles Recording Studio 3 Wally Heider Recording

June 15, 1969

Wally Heider Recording, Los Angeles, Ca. Studio 3, Mixing Eddie Kramer resumed mixing sessions for the proposed live album. Upon completion, the album was handed over to Jimi’s manager Michael Jeffery. Despite their work, however, Reprise Records shelved the live album in favor of the compilation Smash Hits.

eddie kramer Los Angeles Michael Jeffery Recording Reprise Records Wally Heider Recording

August 28, 1969

Hit Factory, New York Studio Recording 1 ) Message To The Universe 2 ) Lover Man 3 ) Izabella 4 ) Message To The Universe 5 ) Izabella 6 ) Burning Desire 7 ) Easy Blues 8 ) Izabella 9 ) Beginnings Jimi returned to the recording studio for the first time in nearly three months. The guitarist was accompanied by his expanded ensemble Gypsy Sun & Rainbows, as well as engineer Eddie Kramer. Jimi had readied a slate of promising new material and looked to make progress on his next studio album. A number of recordings from this session were later issued on disc. The two most prominent were “Message To The Universe”, now a part of South Saturn Delta and “Izabella” from the box set The Jimi Hendrix Experience. While no longer in print, two other recordings from this session have been previously released. An edited version of “Easy Blues” was part of the 1980 compilation Nine To The Universe. “Beginnings” was posthumously overhauled in 1974 and fitted with new overdubs as part of the ill advised [and long since deleted] Midnight Lightning album produced by Alan Douglas.

Beginnings Burning Desire Izabella lover man Message To The Universe Recording

August 29, 1969

Hit Factory, New York Studio Recording 1) Izabella 2) Message To The Universe 3) Izabella 4) Machine Gun 5) Izabella 6) Message To The Universe 7) Jam Jimi returned to the Hit Factory for new attempts at “Izabella” and “Message To The Universe.” A sparse demo of “Machine Gun” was buttressed with overdubs by session musicians in 1974 and issued as part of the controversial [and long since deleted] Midnight Lightning.

Izabella Jam Machine Gun Message To The Universe Recording

August 30, 1969

Hit Factory, New York Studio Recording 1) Sky Blues Today 2) Mastermind 3) Jimi’s Jam Devoting much of the night to new recordings, Hendrix lead the group through “Sky Blues Today”. In addition, guitarist Larry Lee made several attempts at achieving a finished master for his composition “Mastermind.”

Jimi’s Jam Mastermind Recording Sky Blues Today

November 17, 1969

Joined by Billy Cox, Hendrix and Miles returned to the Record Plant studios in New York City to continue work on several new tracks including “Room Full Of Mirrors,” “Stepping Stone,” and “Ezy Rider.” Second engineer Tom Erdelyi recalls additional recordings being worked on including “Izabella,” “Machine Gun,” “Dolly Dagger,” and “Message To Love.” During this session, Hendrix brought in Albert and Arthur Allen (the Ghetto Fighters) to provide backing vocals for “Room Full Of Mirrors.” The basic track of “Room Full Of Mirrors” is the foundation for the recording heard on 1997’s First Ray s Of The New Rising Sun (Experience Hendrix/ MCA, 11599). Afterwards, Hendrix and the Allen twins visited Studio B where Mountain was recording their latest hit, “Mississippi Queen.” Thrilled by the chance meeting, Hendrix invited Leslie West back to his studio for a jam.

billy cox Dolly Dagger Ezy Rider Izabella Machine Gun Message To Love Miles Recording Room Full Of Mirrors Stepping Stone

November 20, 1969

Back at the Record Plant several spirited recordings were put to tape this evening, including six takes of Buddy Miles signature track, “Them Changes” plus a dozen meandering takes of “Burning Desire.” Hendrix was troubled by the tone of his guitar, resulting in few memorable highlights from the night’s session. Despite some technical problems the group continued recording, pressing through two takes of “Lover Man,” described here as “Here Comes Your Lover Man,” plus three lack-luster renditions of “Hear My Train A Comin’.” Prior to the session collapsing, Hendrix returned the group to “Burning Desire” and “Them Changes,” both of which were met with genuine disinterest.

Buddy Miles Burning Desire lover man Record Plant Recording Them Changes

November 21, 1969

Overcoming the lagging spirits of the previous night, Alan Douglas and Stefan Bright brought Tony Bongiovi back into the control room as engineer to help spur on Hendrix’s musical style. As intended, Hendrix lead the group through a high-spirited session of recordings including nineteen takes of “Izabella” of which takes 1, 2, 4, 10, 12, 16, and 19 were tagged ‘complete.’ After a quick change of tape reels, one final take the 20th of “Izabella” was put to tape and flagged as the basic track. With the success of “Izabella” filling the studio air, the group turned to “Burning Desire” although none of the 24 takes featured the emotional intensity of the later. The marathon session continued with additional recordings of “Machine Gun” the fourth and final take was marked complete. Afterwards Hendrix guided the session through 24 takes (without vocals) of “Power Of Soul” which he then described as “Paper Airplanes.”

Alan Douglas Paper Airplanes Power Of Soul Recording Stefan Bright Tony Bongiovi

November 28, 1969

It is unknown to what nature a session took place on this evening. However, a single quarter-inch, two-track recording was made, likely the source from a session as Baggy’s rehearsal studios. The only reference point is that of a notation of the tape box “Buddy Miles/Billy Cox.”

Baggy’s rehearsal studios billy cox Buddy Miles Recording

December 15, 1969

Record Plant, New York Studio Recording Born Under A Bad Sign Lover Man Earth Blues Message To Love Changes Lover Man Burning Desire Back in New York, Hendrix returned to the Record Plant for an extended evening session. Jimi led Buddy Miles and Billy Cox through takes of “Lover Man,” “Izabella,” “Earth Blues,” “Message To Love,” “Changes,” and “Burning Desire”, although no masters were achieved. One recording from this session, an impromptu rendition of Albert King’s “Born Under A Bad Sign” was issued posthumously as part of the 1994 compilation Jimi Hendrix :Blues (Experience Hendrix/MCA, 11060).

Born Under A Bad Sign Burning Desire Changes Earth Blues lover man Message To Love Record Plant Recording

December 18, 1969

Record Plant, New York Studio Recording Ezy Ryder Message To Love Bleeding Heart A long and productive evening of rehearsing and recording for Hendrix, Cox, and Miles. It is not known which session came first, but the Band Of Gypsys spent time on this day at Baggy’s Studios, a makeshift rehearsal facility, and the Record Plant. At the Record Plant, Hendrix and the group made significant progress on “Message To Love,” “Ezy Ryder”, and “Bleeding Heart.” The last of eighteen takes provided a working master for “Message To Love”, although Hendrix opted to retry the song the following evening and this version as scrapped. However, the group successfully recorded the basic track for “Ezy Ryder” on this evening. Additional work in the form of numerous guitar, bass, and vocal overdubs would be completed for this track at Electric Lady Studios during the summer of 1970, but this inspired session yielded the basic rhythm track Hendrix desired. “Ezy Ryder” would later be issued as part of the 1997 compilation First Rays Of The New Rising Sun (Experience Hendrix/MCA, 11599)). Baggy’s Studios, New York Studio Rehearsals At Baggy’s Studios, Hendrix, Cox, and Miles devoted their efforts toward refining the body of songs Hendrix wished to perform as part of his upcoming performances at the Fillmore East. Hendrix had elected to record the Fillmore East performances for a live album he would deliver to capitol records to settle a longstanding legal dispute. “We rehearsed at a place called Baggy’s in New York,” explains Cox. “It was located down by Chinatown. We were there prior to Christmas and then a little after, practicing and rehearsing. We were working up a set with the songs we were going to perform for the [Fillmore East] concert. Then we realized that we had to do four shows and we used quite a few of those numbers in each of the shows.” Baggy’s Studios was a nondescript Manhattan rehearsal facility opened by former Soft Machine road manager Tom Edmonston. Baggy’s was by no means a recording studio designed to compete with the likes of the Record Plant. Baggy’s had no control room; its purpose was to provide a space for artists to rehearse without restriction and at full volume for as much time as they required. This was a simple, yet effective rehearsal facility geared to those such as Hendrix who had no other convenient space to prepare for a live event or concert tour. “Baggy’s had two floors,” remembers Cox. “It was essentially warehouse space. We worked in the large room downstairs. It was a pretty simple set up. There were rugs on the floor and the walls were padded and soundproofed. “ While commonplace now, the concept of a dedicated rehearsal room for rock acts [as opposed to vacant halls or theaters] had only begun to take hold in 1969. Cox explains. “The recording studio was exclusively used for creating and coming up with something new and different. This was something else. Previous to that time, whenever Jimi wanted to rehearse something he would call me up and I would come over to his apartment and we would play through some small amps. Rehearsal space did not exist as we know it today.” Perhaps most importantly, Baggy’s rental rates were a fraction of the cost of similar time at the Record Plant. With Hendrix’s finances hamstrung by the construction cost overruns of his own Electric Lady Studios and the continuing PPX litigation, this was an important consideration. Some of Hendrix’s recordings of the Band Of Gypsys rehearsals have survived. They were originally made at 7 ½ i.p.s. on a two-track reel to reel tape machine. For Hendrix, these recordings served as a convenient tool to measure the group’s progress throughout the rehearsals. Gene McFadden, a member of Hendrix’s road crew, organized the group’s equipment and installed a sound system from which a feed was patched into the tape recorder. Hendrix loaded a full spool of tape and essentially left the machine to run. Each song was recorded live with no overdubs or other such attempts to finish or even polish them. Twelve examples of these spirited rehearsals, many from the long session on this and the following day, are featured as part of the Dagger Records release Jimi Hendrix: The Baggy’s Rehearsal Sessions. Although dates for each recording from Baggy’s are not entirely clear, it is known from tape box markings that “Burning Desire” and “Hoochie Coochie Man” were recorded on this day. Prior to the release of Jimi Hendrix: The Baggy’s Rehearsal Sessions, a few excerpts from Jimi’s rehearsals at Baggy’s have been commercially issued. “Burning Desire” and “Hoochie Coochie Man” first appeared overseas in 1973 as part of the long since deleted Loose Ends compilation. In recent years, the Baggy’s recording of Jimi’s yuletide medley of “Little Drummer Boy”, “Silent Night”, and “Auld Lang Syne” has been issued as the popular CD single Merry Christmas And A Happy New Year.

Baggy’s Studios Bleeding Heart Ezy Ryder Message To Love Record Plant Recording

December 19, 1969

Record Plant, New York Studio Recording Message To Love Earth Blues For the second consecutive evening, Hendrix, Cox, and Miles spent time at both the Record Plant and Baggy’s Studios. It would appear that the group began the evening with an extended rehearsal session at Baggy’s Studios. Afterwards, Hendrix began a separate session with Cox and Miles at the Record Plant beginning at 3 a.m. Hendrix returned to “Message To Love”, achieving a satisfactory basic rhythm track with just a single take. Sixteen takes of “Earth Blues” followed, with the eleventh designated as ‘complete.’ Hendrix would add a host of overdubs to this working master, including guitar, lead vocal, backing vocals by the famed Ronettes, and even a new drum track by Mitch Mitchell before his death the following year. First issued as part of the since deleted Rainbow Bridge soundtrack, “Earth Blues” was reissued in 1997 as part of First Rays Of The New Rising Sun (Experience Hendrix/MCA, 11599). “Message To Love” has since been issued as part of the Jimi Hendrix Experience box set issued in September 2000.

Baggy Studios Earth Blues Message To Love Record Plant Recording

January 07, 1970

Record Plant, New York Studio Recording Stepping Stone Cherokee Mist Hendrix returned to the Record Plant (321 West 44th Street, New York City) for a session that resulted in three takes of “I’m A Man,” (“Stepping Stone”) and one take of “Cherokee Mist” being put to tape. Take three of “I’m A Man” resulted in the basic track that would be revisited again during a session on January 20.

Cherokee Mist I’m A Man Record Plant Recording Stepping Stone

January 07, 1970

Hendrix returned to the Record Plant (321 West 44th Street, New York City) for a studio session that resulted in three takes of “I’m A Man,” (AKA “Stepping Stone”) and one take of “Cherokee Mist” being put to tape. Take three of “I’m A Man” resulted in the basic track that would be revisited again during the session on January 20.

1970 Cherokee Mist hendrix records I’m A Man January 20 january 7 New York City Recording tepping Stone the Record Plant

January 14, 1970

Juggy Sound, New York Studio Recording Jimi and engineer Eddie Kramer begin sifting through the multi-track recordings made of the Band Of Gypsys live performances at the Fillmore East.

Band of Gypsys eddie kramer Fillmore East Juggy Sound Recording

January 15, 1970

Juggy Sound, New York Studio Recording Mixing sessions for what would become Band Of Gypsys continue at Juggy Sound, the midtown Manhattan recording facility owned by Sue Records chief Juggy Murray.

Band of Gypsys Juggy Murray Juggy Sound Recording Sue Records

January 16, 1970

Juggy Sound, New York Studio Recording Record Plant, New York Studio Recording Send My Love To Linda Power Of Soul Burning Desire Jimi began the evening with Eddie Kramer at Juggy Sound. The two continued in their effort to craft a live album from the four Fillmore East performances. In the early morning hours following the mixing session, Hendrix traveled to the Record Plant to join forces with Cox and Miles for a series of promising demo recordings. Jimi efforts yielded a rough sketch of “Send My Love To Linda” which progressed into a lively, extended jam. Additionally, twelve takes of “Paper Airplanes” (which would evolve as “Power Of Soul”) and five takes of “Burning Desire” were also put to tape.

eddie kramer Fillmore East Juggy Sound Recording

January 16, 1970

In a session at the Record Plant, overseen by engineer Bob Hughes and second engineer Dave Ragno, Hendrix crafted a rough sketch of “Send My Love To Linda” which featured Miles on drums and Cox on bass. As the track progressed it extended into a lively extended jam. Additionally, twelve takes of “Paper Airplanes” (AKA “Power Of Soul”) and five takes of “Burning Desire” were also put to tape.

1970 billy cox Bob Hughes Buddy Miles Burning Desire Dave Ragno January 16 Paper Airplanes Power Of Soul Record Plant Recording Send My Love To Linda

January 19, 1970

Juggy Sound, New York Studio Recording Once more, Jimi began the evening with Eddie Kramer mixing potential candidates for the Band Of Gypsys live album at Juggy Sound. Neither Cox nor Miles played any role in the mixing or track decisions for the album. As Hendrix was the producer, such decisions were reserved entirely for him. Record Plant, New York Studio Recording Burning Desire Backwards Experiment At the Record Plant with Cox and Miles, Hendrix devoted time on this evening to experimenting with different backward guitar effects. This session also saw additional work on “Burning Desire” but with little noticeable progress toward the completion of a basic track.

Band of Gypsys eddie kramer Juggy Sound Recording

January 19, 1970

Returning to the Record Plant Hendrix begins experimenting with different backward guitar effects. This session also saw additional work on “Burning Desire” but with little noticeable advancement on finalizing a basic track.

1970 Burning Desire January 19 Record Plant Recording

January 20, 1970

Record Plant, New York Studio Recording Message To Love Stepping Stone Earth Blues Ezy Ryder A vibrant session which featured Hendrix revisiting the December 19, Record Plant recording of “Message To Love.” The group completed a series of overdubs for this track including the recording of a new lead guitar part by Hendrix. The group also revisited “Earth Blues” (Take 11) from the same December 19 session, completing a series of overdubs and a new lead guitar track. In revisiting take three of “I’m A Man” (January 7), Hendrix renamed the track “Sky Blues Today” while adding new guitar overdubs to the recording. Hendrix also revisited the December 18 recording of “Ezy Ryder.” Rough mixes for each of the session’s recordings were also completed. Hendrix would return to both songs at Electric Lady Studios later that summer.

Earth Blues Ezy Ryder Message To Love Recording Stepping Stone

January 20, 1970

Revisiting the December 19 recording of “Message To Love,” during an evening session back at the Record Plant, the group completed the final overdubs for this track while Hendrix added a new lead guitar part to the master. The group also revisited “Earth Blues” (Take 11) from the same December 19 session – adding a series of overdubs and a new lead guitar track.

In revisiting take three of “I’m A Man” (January 7), Hendrix retitled the track “Sky Blues Today” while adding new guitar overdubs to the recording. Hendrix also revisited the December 18 recording of “Ezy Ryder.” Rough mixes for each of the session’s recordings were also completed, which would later be revisited at Electric Lady Studios later that summer.

1970 December 19 Earth Blues Electric Lady Studios Ezy Ryder I’m A Man January 20 Message To Love overdubslead guitar track Recording Sky Blues Today Take 11 the Record Plant

January 21, 1970

Juggy Sound, New York Studio Recording As had been the case since mixing sessions began on January 14, Hendrix and Kramer huddled at Juggy Sound to continue their work on Band Of Gypsys. Record Plant, New York Studio Recording Message To Love Stepping Stone Earth Blues Ezy Ryder Following his work at Juggy, Hendrix joined Cox, and Miles at the Record Plant for an extended session that began with fourteen takes of “Power Of Soul” (still referred under the working title of “Crash Landing”) put to tape, and although takes 2, 4, and 6 were complete, no master track was flagged. Recorded three weeks after the group’s legendary Fillmore East concerts, the Band Of Gypsys meticulously crafted this prototypical illustration of sophisticated funk. Hendrix would revisit the track on February 3, 1970, overdubbing guitar parts and creating a rough mix. At that stage, work on “Power Of Soul” drew to a close. Hendrix instead chose to feature a live version of the song as part of Band Of Gypsys, issued in March 1970. The January/February 1970 studio recording of “Power Of Soul” was shelved until the marathon mixing sessions Hendrix staged at Electric Lady Studios in August 1970. As Jimi reviewed the many contenders for his projected double album First Rays Of The New Rising Sun, “Power Of Soul” was treated to a new rough mix, resulting in the unique delay effect heard during the song’s opening. Because “Power Of Soul” had been featured on Band Of Gypsys, Jimi had not reserved a position for the song on First Rays Of The New Rising Sun. Although considered for The Cry Of Love, the first posthumous album of Jimi’s unissued studio material, “Power Of Soul” remained unavailable until a truncated version was overhauled and included as part of the controversial 1975 compilation Crash Landing. The original master was edited and remixed to accommodate overdubs recorded in 1974 by session percussionist Jimmy Maeulen. Lasting only 3:15 and retitled “With The Power”, the elaborate introduction and its two soaring lead guitar solos were scrapped. The version featured on the 1997 compilation South Saturn Delta discards the posthumous additions, restoring the full-length version with all of its regal glory intact. Jimi then presented the evening’s most pleasant surprise, seven takes of “Astro Man”. “This is gonna be fun!” laughed Jimi before launching into a enthusiastic rendition of “Astro Man”, his comic cartoon fable. The song’s inspiration was simple, drawing its roots from Jimi’s love for animated cartoons. “That’s what ‘Astro Man’ was all about,” laughs Cox. “We used to love watching cartoons at his apartment. He enjoyed Mighty Mouse and especially loved Rocky and Bullwinkle.” Take seven would later be featured as part of The Jimi Hendrix Experience box set. Jimi closed the evening with a single, unsuccessful attempt at realizing a basic track for the promising “Valleys Of Neptune.” In other news outside the recording studio, the January 21 issue of Variety magazine announced the upcoming Isle Of Wight Festival of Music, a five-day musical extravaganza slated for August on the small island located off the south coast of England. Of the event, Variety explains, “The first two days will be a film fest. It is hoped to premier a couple of films of the Easy Rider genre [Murray Lerner’s acclaimed Festival!, a documentary about the Newport Folk Festival, was one of the films scheduled]. The remainder will be a conventional progressive pop bash with about 30 acts taking part. Policy is to not book more than two big names as crowd pullers as they tend to overshadow other acts. No bookings have yet been made.”

Astro Man billy cox Buddy Miles extended session jam sessions Jimi Hendrix Recording

January 21, 1970

Another marathon session at the Record Plant took place on this night with fourteen takes of “Power Of Soul” (still referred under the working title of “Crash Landing”) put to tape, and although takes 2, 4, and 6 were complete, no master track was flagged. Hendrix the introduced six takes of “Astro Man” before closing the session with one uneventful take of “Valleys Of Neptune.”

In 1974, Alan Douglas pulled the fourth (and complete) take of “Power Of Soul” and included it on the dismal collection Crash Landing (Reprise Records, MS 2204) albeit remixed and overdubbed with percussion by Jimmy Maeulen and subsequently retitled as “With The Power.”

The January 21 issue of Variety magazine announces the upcoming Isle Of Wight Festival of Music – a five-day musical extravaganza slated for August 30 on the small island off the south coast of England. Of the event, Variety explains, “the first two days will be a film fest. It is hoped to premier a couple of films of the Easy Rider genre. The remainder will be a conventional progressive pop bash with about 30 acts taking part. Policy is to not book more than two big names as crowd pullers as they tend to overshadow other acts. No bookings have yet been made.”

1970 1974 Alan Douglas Astro Man Crash Landing January 21 Jimmy Maeulen overdubbed Power Of Soul Recording the Record Plant Valleys Of Neptune Variety magazine With The Power

January 22, 1970

Record Plant, New York Studio Recording Sky Blues Today [Stepping Stone] Izabella Hendrix prepared new mixes of “Sky Blues Today” and “Izabella”.

Izabella mix Recording Sky Blues Today

January 22, 1970

Back at the Record Plant, rough mixes of “Sky Blues Today” and “Izabella” were prepared but later scrapped in favor of new ones.

1970 Izabella January 22 Recording rough mixes Sky Blues Today the Record Plant

January 23, 1970

Record Plant, New York Studio Recording A wild evening of inspired jamming by Jimi. One of the evening’s many highlights was a remarkable “Villanova Junction Blues” that lasted over fifteen minutes. Several other extended jams were recorded on this evening including “MLK,” “Slow Time Blues,” “Country Blues,” and “Burning Desire.” In addition to Cox and Miles, an unidentified harmonica player would also join Hendrix. Jimi and company launched into a lengthy workout of Carl Perkins’ “Blue Suede Shoes.” An edited version of this recording was later included as part of the 1973 international compilation Loose Ends. Hendrix also made efforts at “Freedom,” “Midnight Lightning,” and “Highways Of Desire”. This work gradually segued into “Seven Dollars In My Pocket,” an impromptu blues. Following the blues groove already set in place, Hendrix then began “Country Blues”. This extraordinary recording was not a numbered take, but rather another inspired jam session. Hendrix, Cox, and Miles relished such interplay and “Country Blues” is a joyous example of their shared musical vocabulary. This recording would become one of the highlights of The Jimi Hendrix Experience box set issued in September 2000. One other song from this session, an edited version of the blues workout “Once I Had A Woman,” has also been released, last included as part of the 1994 collection Jimi Hendrix :Blues (Experience Hendrix/MCA, MCAD-11060).

Burning Desire Country Blues MLK Recording Slow Time Blues Villanova Junction Blues

January 23, 1970

With Bob Hughes and Dave Ragno monitoring the control desk, Hendrix guided the band through lively renditions of “Villanova Junction Blues” including one take lasting in excess of fifteen minutes. Several extended jams were recorded on this evening including “MLK,” “Slow Time Blues,” and “Burning Desire.”

Later joined by an unidentified harp player, Hendrix leads the session through another extended track, this time Carl Perkins’ “Blue Suede Shoes.” Joined by Billy Cox, Hendrix also dabbled around “Freedom” and “Highways Of Desire” the later which gradually segued into “Seven Dollars In My Pocket.”

Following the blues groove already set in place, Hendrix then began to tackle “Midnight Lightning,” “Freedom,” “Country Blues,” and “Once I Had A Woman.” In 1974, an edited take of “Once I Had A Woman” featuring overdubbed harmonica parts by Buddy Lucas was prepped for 1975’s compilation Midnight Lightning (Reprise Records, MS 2229). An extended rendition was also later included on 1994’s Jimi Hendrix :Blues (Experience Hendrix/MCA, MCAD-11060).

1970 billy cox Blue Suede Shoes Bob Hughes Burning Desire Carl Perkins Country Blues Dave Ragno Freedom Highways Of Desire January 23 MLK Once I Had A Woman Recording Slow Time Blues Villanova Junction Blues

February 02, 1970

Juggy Sound, New York Studio Recording Mixing sessions for Band Of Gypsys resumed. Before the evening session began, Hendrix engaged in a jam session with the Rosicrucians, a Queens-based group whose album Eddie Kramer had been producing at the studio. Two separate recordings were made before Hendrix concluded the jam.

Band of Gypsys eddie kramer Recording Rosicrucians

February 03, 1970

Record Plant, New York Studio Recording Hendrix completed overdubs onto his January 21 Record Plant recording of “Power Of Soul”. A new mix was also prepared.

complete mix Power Of Soul Recording

February 03, 1970

Rough mixes of the January 21 cuts of “Power Of Soul” was prepared.

1970 February 3 Power Of Soul Recording

February 05, 1970

Juggy Sound, New York Studio Recording In the early morning hours of February 5, Jimi returned to Juggy Sound as mixing sessions for Band Of Gypsys continued. By this stage, final mixes for “Who Knows” and “Machine Gun” had been crafted and set aside. Hendrix had completed the album’s first side and now focused his energies on completing side two. Among the songs mixed by Hendrix and Kramer but not selected for the album were “Stone Free” [1/1/70 2nd Show] and “Hear My Train A Comin’” [12/31/69 1st Show]

Band of Gypsys hear my train a comin' Juggy Sound Machine Gun Recording Stone Free Who Knows

February 08, 1970

Record Plant, Los Angeles Studio Recording Although Jimi was not present at the Record Plant’s Los Angeles studio, engineers Stan Agol and Dan Turbeville mixed a four-track recording of “Star Spangled Banner” for the upcoming Woodstock movie soundtrack.

Dan Turbeville Recording Stan Agol Star Spangled Banner Woodstock movie

February 08, 1970

Although Jimi was not present at the Record Plant’s Los Angeles studio, engineers Stan Agol and Dan Turbeville mixed a four-track recording of “Star Spangled Banner” for the upcoming Woodstock soundtrack (Cotillion, SD 3500) was completed

Dan Turbeville oodstock soundtrack record plant LA studio Recording Stan Agol Star Spangled Banner the Record Plant

February 11, 1970

Record Plant, New York Studio Recording A mixing session dedicated to the Band Of Gypsys studio recording of “Izabella.”

Band of Gypsys Izabella Recording session

February 11, 1970

During a mixing session for Band Of Gypsys at the Record Plant, Dave Ragno and Bob Hughes joined Hendrix for the completion of a rough mix of “Izabella.”

1970 Band of Gypsys Bob Hughes Dave Ragno february 11 Izabella Recording the Record Plant

February 12, 1970

Record Plant, New York Studio Recording Work continued on the mixing of “Izabella” before Hendrix and engineer Bob Hughes crafted what was deemed the master. This mix, coupled with “Stepping Stone”, would later be issued by Reprise as a single in April 1970. The track can now be heard as part of the Voodoo Child: The Jimi Hendrix compilation. With “Izabella” deemed complete, Hendrix began work on mixes of “Sky Blues Today” [“Stepping Stone”].

Bob Hughes Izabella Recording Sky Blues Today Stepping Stone Voodoo Child

February 12, 1970

Back at the Record Plant, additional rough mixes of “Izabella” plus “Sky Blues Today” were completed. The mix of “Izabella” was considered the master.

1970 february 12 Izabella Recording rough mixes Sky Blues Today the Record Plant

February 14, 1970

Juggy Sound, New York Studio Recording The mixing and editing of “Changes”, “Power Of Soul”, “Message To Love”, and “We Gotta Live Together” was the focus of this session by Hendrix and Kramer. One such edit was the removal of a short section of Hendrix’s guitar An early section of “Power Of Soul”, marred by a short burst of Hendrix’s out of tune guitar, was trimmed from the master.

Changes Message To Love Power Of Soul Recording We Gotta Live Together

February 15, 1970

Juggy Sound, New York Studio Recording Hendrix and Eddie Kramer continued final editing and mixing of the Band Of Gypsys album at Juggy Sound. Record Plant, New York Studio Recording Following his session at Juggy, Hendrix went to the Record Plant where a master mix for “Sky Blues Today” was achieved during this Record Plant. This master, later retitled “Stepping Stone” by the guitarist, was coupled with February 12 master of “Izabella” and would be released on April 13, 1970 as a Reprise Records single.

Band of Gypsys Izabella Recording Sky Blues Today Stepping Stone

February 15, 1970

A master mix for “Sky Blues Today” was achieved during the session at the Records Plant. This master, coupled with “Izabella” from the session on the 12th would later be released (April 13, 1970) on the short-run single “Stepping Stone” b/w “Izabella” (Reprise Records, 0905)

1970 April 13 February 15 Izabella master mix Recording Reprise Records Sky Blues Today Stepping Stone the Records Plant

February 16, 1970

Juggy Sound, New York Studio Recording Record Plant, New York Studio Recording On this evening, Hendrix traveled to the Record Plant after mixing sessions at Juggy Sound had concluded. Upon his arrival, an informal jam session with Buddy Miles ensued. Two instrumental attempts at “Blue Suede Shoes” were put to tape. Later, Hendrix put forward an early version of what would become to “Hey Baby (New Rising Sun).” Singing live and supported only by drums and percussion, Hendrix wove gorgeous touches of Spanish flamenco styling within the arrangement. An impish stab at Eddie Cochran’s “Summertime Blues”—a favorite of the guitarist’s when he was a teenager in Seattle—was followed by a funky original work reminiscent of “Day Tripper.” Soon thereafter Billy Cox and Mitch Mitchell arrived. Buddy Miles departed and work began on “Freedom”. This recording, issued on The Jimi Hendrix Experience box set, is dramatically different than the version now included as part of First Rays Of The New Rising Sun. Most notably, Jimi devised an inventive, extended introduction and, in contrast to his efforts the previous summer with Gypsys Sun & Rainbows, skillfully integrated the percussion effort of Juma Sultan.

billy cox Blue Suede Shoes Buddy Miles Eddie Cochran Hey Baby Juggy Sound Mitch Mitchell Record Plant Recording

February 17, 1970

Juggy Sound, New York Studio Recording Hendrix and Eddie Kramer completed the final editing, mixing, and sequencing for the Band Of Gypsys album.

Band of Gypsys complete eddie kramer Recording

February 18, 1970

Sterling Sound, New York Studio Recording Hendrix and Kramer team with mastering engineer Bob Ludwig to supervise the final mastering for Band Of Gypsys. In light of his disappointment with the mastering of Electric Ladyland by Reprise Records, Hendrix opts to work independently to insure that the final sound quality meets his satisfaction.

Band of Gypsys Bob Ludwig Electric Ladyland Kramer Recording Reprise Records

February 19, 1970

Sterling Sound, New York Studio Recording After reviewing test pressings of the mastering efforts of the previous day, some minor sonic adjustments are completed.

adjustments Band of Gypsys Recording

March 15, 1970

Island Studios, London Studio Recording Jimi was recruited by Stephen Stills to lend guitar to his upcoming debut solo release, Stephen Stills (Atlantic Records, 1970). Jimi added lead guitar to the track “Old Times, Good Times” and also recorded some additional tracks with Stills that remain unreleased.

Old Times Good Times Recording Stephen Stills times

March 17, 1970

Olympic Studios, London Studio Recording Hendrix returned to Olympic Studios, the recording facility where his first two albums Are You Experienced and Axis: Bold As Love were recorded to record with Love. Invited by Love founder Arthur Lee to contribute to their album, Hendrix and percussionist Remi Kabaka joined Love in recording “The Everlasting First,” which would later be issued as part of False Start (Blue Thumb, 1970). In addition, Hendrix took part in an extended instrumental jam session as well as a version of his own composition, “Ezy Ryder.”

Are You Experienced. Bold As Love Arthur Lee Ezy Ryder Olympic Studios Recording Remi Kabaka The Everlasting First

March 20, 1970

Now a solo artist, Noel Redding begins recording the album Nervous Breakdown at New York’s Sound Center Studios. Redding was joined by vocalist Roger Chapman (Family), Paul Caruso, organist Gerry Guida (Big Three) and fifteen year old drummer Steve Angel. The sessions included recordings of “Walking Through The Garden,” (previously recorded by Fat Mattress) and Eddie Cochrane’s “Nervous Breakdown.” Also recorded were “Everything’s Blue,” “Highway,” “Eric The Red,” “Wearing Yellow,” and “Blues In ¾.” Ever industrious, Redding copped support from many friends who joined the bassist in the studio including Lee Michaels, Neil Landon and even the doorman from the Penn Garden Hotel (on bagpipes no less).

Gerry Guida Nervous Breakdown Noel Redding Paul Caruso Recording Roger Chapman Sound Center Studios Steve Angel

March 23, 1970

Hendrix joined his former bassist to add guitar to Redding’s own “My Friend.” The song remains unreleased however, as despite his best efforts, Redding’s self-financed project never saw commercial release.

My Friend Recording Redding

March 23, 1970

Working alone, Jimi arrived at the Record Plant intent on realizing a more traditional Delta blues arrangement of “Midnight Lightning” than he had previously attempted. Singing and playing live as he sat on a chair, Jimi utilized a finger picking style he rarely incorporated on his recordings. The song’s slow beat was accented, in the tradition of such blues men as Lightnin’ Hopkins and John Lee Hooker, by the steady tapping of his foot on the floor. One of his favorite blues themes, Jimi would later make several attempts to complete a group version with Cox and Mitchell that summer at Electric Lady. Sadly, his untimely death in September 1970 came before “Midnight Lightning” and many other scintillating works in progress could be completed.

billy cox Midnight Lightning Record Plant Recording

March 24, 1970

Hendrix began this session joined by an unidentified drummer [likely Steve Angel] and together the two players recorded a quick rendition of “Bleeding Heart”. This was followed by three takes of “Midnight Lightning.” Bassist Billy Cox joined the session and s the tandem ran through four takes of “Bleeding Heart,” the later of which was flagged as the master and later transferred to Jimi’s own Electric Lady Studios where additional guitar and a new drum part were overdubbed by Jimi and Mitch Mitchell. Although Jimi never fully completed “Bleeding Heart” prior to his death, it has since been issued as part of First Rays Of The New Rising Sun (Experience Hendrix/MCA, 1997).

billy cox Bleeding Heart Midnight Lightning Recording Steve Angel

May 14, 1970

Always privy to hitting the studio to try out some new songs, Hendrix led the group back to New York. Although work on Jimi’s own Electric Lady Studios was nearing completion, after a brief test session with Eddie Kramer on piano, it was decided that more tweaking was necessary at the new facility before Hendrix should christen it. Instead, Kramer booked Hendrix and the band into the familiar surroundings of the Record Plant’s newly opened “Studio C.” Here Jimi lead the band through a number of recordings including three takes of “Come Down Hard On Me,” a series of rough instrumentals of “Straight Ahead,” the fourth take evolved into a jam of “Night Bird Flying.” An abandoned rendition of “Lower Alcatraz” quickly crumbled before Hendrix dove into unique renditions of “Midnight Lightning” and “Keep On Groovin’.” Playing around on his guitar Jimi plucked a few chords to “Power Of Soul” before jumping full-speed into “Straight Ahead” which was later followed by a feverish rendition of “Freedom.” Jokingly moving forward, Hendrix lightened the mood in the studio with Frankie Laine’s “Catastrophe,” which caused Kramer to remark on the talkback, “at a hundred and fifty dollars an hour, that’s pretty good.” When the laughter died down, Jimi frolicked in a hearty version of “Hey Baby (New Rising Sun) before the session came to an end.

Electric Lady Studios Recording studio

May 15, 1970

Returning to the “Studio C” at the Record Plant, continued work on “Freedom” was the focus of the group’s attention, resulting in 19 takes of the song, of which 15 were particularly spirited, although no master resulted from these takes Hendrix moved future studio work on “Freedom” over to his own Electric Lady Studios in late June. The session also featured work on “Valleys Of Neptune,” “Peter Gunn,” and “Catastrophe,” the later two debuting posthumously on War Heroes (Reprise Records, 1972). Making another attack on “Freedom,” Jimi was left unsatisfied and turned his attention back to “Hey Baby (New Rising Sun),” which at this point was styled similarly to the rendition that is currently available on First Rays Of The New Rising Sun (Experience Hendrix/MCA, 1997). Before ending the session, he led the band through an energetic rendition of “Lover Man.”

Freedom Hey Baby Record Plant Recording Studio C

June 15, 1970

Jimi holds his first recording session in the new Electric Lady Studios at 52 West 8th Street in the heart of Greenwich Village. Hendrix invites his friends Steve Winwood and Chris Wood from Traffic into the studio where they quickly break into an impromptu jam session. With Mitch Mitchell unavailable Eddie Kramer volunteered Dave Palmer to sit in behind the drums for the session. As the night progressed, Jimi was able to coax Wood and Winwood into providing some backing vocals on ”Ezy Rider” which Jimi was carrying over from his stints at the Record Plant. Also put to tape on this night were renditions of Traffic’s own “Pearl Queen” and Winwood’s own “Rhythm Ace.” Work soon progressed to Jimi’s composition, “Valleys Of Neptune” before segueing into a loose untitled jazz-focused jam and later a track titled “Slow Blues.” Jenny Dean, a mutual friend of Jimi and Winwood, offered backing vocals on the later recording.

Chris Wood Electric Lady Studios first recording session Greenwich Village Recording Steve Winwood

June 16, 1970

Back at Electric Lady Jimi records the master takes of “Night Bird Flying” and “Straight Ahead.” Joined by percussionist Juma Sultan these sessions proved to be among his most productive in the post-Electric Ladyland days. He follows these recordings with takes of “Beginnings,” “Freedom,” and a loose recording simply titled “Messing Around.”

Beginnings Electric Lady Freedom Juma Sultan Night Bird Flying Recording Straight Ahead

June 17, 1970

Returning once again to Electric Lady, Hendrix enthusiastically kicked off the session right where the prior night’s left off. In visiting “Straight Ahead” Hendrix, Billy Cox, and Mitch Mitchell concentrated on forming a new master take of the song. The trio then moves to recordings for “Astro Man.” Feeling playful, Jimi brings the session to a quick halt before yelling for tape machine to start recording. Assured that the tapes are rolling Jimi breaks into a high octave vocal take of “Drifter’s Escape.”

billy cox Electric Lady Hendrix Mitch Mitchell Recording Straight Ahead

June 24, 1970

Returning to Electric Lady Studios after a series of West Coast tour dates, Hendrix jumped right back into a series of strong recordings kicked off by a playful series of takes of “Astro Man.” As the night progressed Hendrix guided the group through recordings of “Rollin’ Stone,” “In From The Storm,” and a rendition of Cream’s “Politician.” Hendrix then tore into a 26-minute untitled jam before breaking into “Beginnings,” “Hey Baby (New Rising Sun),” “Straight Ahead,” “Midnight Lightning,” and finally “Freedom.”

Astro Man Beginnings Electric Lady Studios Midnight Lightning Politician Recording

June 25, 1970

Building on the momentum of the previous night’s session the group, now joined by Juma Sultan, revisit “Astro Man” before debuting the new ballad, “Drifting.” The session also included work on “Freedom” and “Cherokee Mist.”

Astro Man Cherokee Mist Drifting Freedom Juma Sultan Recording

June 26, 1970

Hendrix returned to Electric Lady where he revisited a number of previously recorded compositions for overdubbing. Work on this night included visits to “Message To Love,” “Earth Blues,“ “Steeping Stone,” Valleys Of Neptune,” and a rough demo of “Heaven Has No Sorrow.”

Earth Blues Electric Lady Heaven Has No Sorrow Message To Love Recording Steeping Stone Valleys Of Neptune

June 29, 1970

Jimi works on overdubs for the track, “Drifting” which Eddie Kramer and second engineer Kim King oversaw at Electric Lady Studios.

Drifting eddie kramer Electric Lady Studios Kim King Recording

July 01, 1970

Today’s session proved one of the most fulfilling for Jimi at his new studio. Here, recordings focused on “Dolly Dagger,” “Bolero,” “Hey Baby (New Rising Sun),” “Drifting,” and “Slow Part,” which would posthumously be retitled “Pali Gap” by Michael Jeffrey who wanted to craft a stronger tie with that song and the title of his Hawaiian film, Rainbow Bridge. The session later included work on “Midnight Lightning” and “Beginnings” before returning to “Dolly Dagger” before night’s end.

Bolero Dolly Dagger Drifting Hey Baby (New Rising Sun) Midnight Lightning Recording Slow Part

July 02, 1970

Another day of recordings at Electric Lady resulted in considerable progress on “Ezy Rider.”

Electric Lady Ezy Rider Recording

July 14, 1970

In returning to Electric Lady Studios Jimi records “Come Down Hard On Me,” “Bolero,” and “Midnight Lightning.” Despite the work accomplished on this night, Hendrix had the tape boxes marked DO NOT USE.

Bolero Come Down Hard On Me Electric Lady Studios Midnight Lightning Recording

July 15, 1970

Additional sessions at Electric Lady saw Hendrix revitalize previous work on “Come Down Hard On Me.” In 1973 Electric Lady’s engineer John Jansen posthumously edited the track for inclusion on Loose Ends.

Come Down Hard On Me Electric Lady John Jansen Recording

July 19, 1970

Back at Electric Lady Studios, Jimi once again worked on “Night Bird Flying,” “Straight Ahead,” “Astro Man,” Freedom,” and “Dolly Dagger.”

Astro Man Dolly Dagger Electric Lady Studios Freedom Night Bird Flying Recording Straight Ahead

July 20, 1970

Trying to lay claim to a definitive master of “Lover Man,” Hendrix returned to Electric Lady to try and revitalize the recordings, unfortunately, with little success on this evening. Although a rough mix would be prepared, it too would be quickly shelved. With “Lover Man” now on the shelf, Hendrix turned his attention back to overdubs for “Angel.”

Angel Electric Lady lover man Recording

July 21, 1970

Tonight’s session at Electric Lady maintained focus on “In From The Storm,” a recording that Jimi had previously titled “Tune X – Just Came In.” Although no master was created on this night, thirty takes of the song were put to tape as the trio continually reworked it and polished the composition through each subsequent retake.

Electric Lady In From The Storm Recording Tune X – Just Came In

July 22, 1970

Back at Electric Lady Studios Hendrix revisited “In From The Storm” before working on “Come Down Hard On Me” and “Just Came In,” with the latter being remixed into “In From The Storm” on the posthumous Cry Of Love.

Come Down Hard On Me Electric Lady Studios In From The Storm Just Came In Recording

July 23, 1970

With the band headed back on the road in 24 hours, Hendrix wanted to leave the studio with the reassurance that progress was being made. Tonight’s sessions included work on “Drifting,” “Angel,” and “Belly Button Window.”

Angel Belly Button Window Drifting Jimi Hendrix Experience Recording

August 14, 1970

Having returned from Hawaii, Jimi quickly jumped back into the studio where further progress could be made on the recordings from July. Tonight’s session included work on overdubs for “Dolly Dagger” and “Freedom.”

Dolly Dagger Freedom Recording

August 18, 1970

With more overdubs required on “Dolly Dagger”, Jimi returned to Electric Lady with Eddie Kramer and Dave Palmer where additional parts for the track were put to tape.

Dave Palmer Dolly Dagger eddie kramer Electric Lady Recording

August 20, 1970

The session kicks off with a short, slow blues jam but is cut short due to a malfunctioning tape machine. When the system is repaired Hendrix begins to work on a series of rough mixes for “Straight Ahead,” “Room Full Of Mirrors,” “Ezy Rider,” “In From The Storm,” “Drifting,” “Angel,” “Belly Button Window,” “Dolly Dagger,” and “Freedom.” French television broadcasts L’Appiche De Monde: Festival Atlanta, which includes Jimi’s performance of “Stone Free” captured during the July 4th celebration in Georgia.

Angel Belly Button Window Drifting Ezy Rider In From The Storm L’Appiche De Monde Recording Room Full Of Mirrors Straight Ahead

August 22, 1970

Returning to Electric Lady, Jimi continues to work on rough mixes for “Night Bird Flying,” “Straight Ahead,” “Drifter’s Escape,” “Ezy Rider,” “Come Down Hard On Me,” “Beginnings,” “Cherokee Mist,” “In From The Storm,” “Valleys Of Neptune,” “Astro Man,” and “Belly Button Window” overdubs.

Beginnings Cherokee Mist Come Down Hard On Me Drifter’s Escape Electric Lady Ezy Rider In From The Storm Night Bird Flying Recording Straight Ahead

August 26, 1970

Electric Lady Studios officially opens with a grand celebration with Jimi in attendance. Reprise Records issues the LP Historic Performances Recorded At The Monterey International Pop Festival (MS 2029), which features the unique pairing of Jimi Hendrix and Otis Redding from the 1967 event. Hendrix’s involvement on the release came in the form of recordings of “Like A Rolling Stone,” “Rock Me Baby,” “Can You See Me,” and the incendiary “Wild Thing.” This album marked the very last recordings of Jimi Hendrix to be released during his lifetime.

Electric Lady Studios Monterey International Pop Festival Recording Reprise Records Wild Thing

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